Treatment of Suicidal Deaf People

 

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There is an important discussion about the surge of suicide rates in America. This morning when I woke up and discovered the most recent news about chef Anthony Bourdain who committed suicide in France. It was tragic, indeed. Less than 24 hours ago, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued alerting news about suicide: 30% percent across the nation since 1999.

I am focusing on Deaf Community. CDC showed a nationwide map of states showing which the highest suicide rates. Idaho, one of the highest suicide states, most recently, a Deaf couple—‘murder and suicide’; Depression is invisible stigma. I had my battle with suicide tendencies in the past even as Gallaudet graduate student few years ago. Mental health at Gallaudet University is major problem.

In 1988, I was in eighth grade, I remember getting the news on a small school bus and was informed that Greg, a Deaf friend of mine who rode on the same school bus with me, committed suicide and that was a major flashback for me. Greg was a phenomenal artist. It was not supposed to be that way.

Two Deaf persons committed suicide within last four years in Gallaudet community. It is profound. Last March 2018, a Deaf student at Illinois School for the Deaf committed suicide. Few years ago, a Deaf student in California committed suicide. I could go on more.

Last year, I wrote a post, Suicide is a Big Problem in Deaf Community https://audismnegatsurdi.com/2017/04/03/suicide-is-a-big-problem-in-deaf-community/ has reflected many things. Labeling is powerful. Hate is a bigger problem. The mental health does impact Deaf community. The problem is that it is not enough discussed. Before everyone continue to rush to judgment and do their due diligence on the society. Each and every one of you needs to understand that when suicide rates in Deaf community is invisible now and then; the society has absolutely no interest in the truth.

They are after one thing: lack of knowledge. Suicide is a tragedy act. Deaf community should be not shunned. How does they teach the society when Deaf community should earn an earned opportunity—earned by knowledge? At any rate, America used to be the land of chances and Deaf community rarely believes in second chances as from walks of life dealing with their struggles.

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There are plenty of Deaf people struggling for counseling. Deaf community is not enough discussed in mental health community.

How can the society allow Deaf community to resume their own lives? This is a terrible and faulty narrative about Deaf community. The notion that Deaf community does not feel the pain is simply not a factual. To be sure, there is a huge impact on them. Sometimes, depending on situations, the most brutal ones imaginable.

But mental health community, for example, counseling can make a great leap of difference, and for those Deaf people who seek support and help, in fact, overcome adversity and labeling. Further, how long is long enough for Deaf community to suffer suicide awareness? We must remember that Deaf community is the gatekeepers to all knowledge regarding struggles and suicide awareness.

Stigma reinforces Deaf community. There is a direct line between struggle and help—a human error that would lead to suicides and that is where the society is ignorant about Deaf community. To accept the reality would be to acknowledge that suicide is nothing but a powerful statement, used by hearing privileges to divide Deaf community. It is simply baffling that Deaf community struggle to seek support system. Moreover, the mental crisis seems to be no longer the community accountability.

The only challenge for the crisis is that Deaf community must continue and support mental awareness of any kind is well discussed about suicide awareness and human responsibility.

Please visit Deaf Counseling Center:

www.deafcounseling.com

https://audismnegatsurdi.com/2018/05/23/why-mental-health-awareness-month-is-important-for-deaf-community/

-JT

Copyright © 2018 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

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‘Sign Gene’: Blood, Guns, and Testosterone

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When you see the statue of Laurent Clerc on Gallaudet campus, it is the world’s most valuable and earthed symbols of Deaf community. It has ruined the image of Laurent Clerc. The roots of gun violence is not enough examined.

After watching the movie, “Sign Gene”, we the Deaf patrons appear uncomfortable with the gun violence. Co-producers of the movie are both are professors in Department of ASL/Deaf Studies at Gallaudet, the same leadership, the advancement of knowledge, has fallen under a cloud of compassion that it is also falls under a wrong agenda.

It blows my mind away and heart-broken to see this movie was showing so much violence and graphic. The movie was so graphic and violent—did Gallaudet administration watch the film before it was approved in the public eye? It continues to be seen as the problem rather than the challenge.

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We must continue to challenge against gun culture in America. Around 1 million people showed up in DC to support March for our Lives few months ago to stand up against gun violence. Gun violence is important to talk about with everyone. And because it is so important, we need to talk about it more.

This movie, “Sign Gene” has shown plenty of mental health stigmas. And that leads me to share this question I found recently. “What role does mental stigma play in the debate over gun violence and gun policy, specifically stigma?” questioned by Audrey Hamilton. Whose is responsible for this?

Seeing gun violence everyday in America is a critical social problem. Standing up against gun violence is an important of people’s overall health. Their mental health is an important as their physical health. Talking about gun violence is important to others. Gun violence is difficult to talk about. Talking about gun violence is important at every stage in people’s life. Gun violence is more common than you think. Gun violence is caused by trauma and violence.

A German philosopher Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) wrote: “Treat people as if they were what they ought to be, and you help them to become what they are capable of being.”

But why would Department of ASL/Deaf Studies who sponsored the film and co-produced by two professors chose to carry the tradition of gun violence and help them to become what they are capable of carrying guns in the image of Deaf community?

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So does this mean the gun violence cannot be interpreted? Or does it mean that gun violence stories cannot be interpreted? What about victims and survivors of gun violence who share their stories are about but ignored in ASL? Knowledge is pain, and challenges the practice of gun violence as effective oppressors in the Deaf community.

It is important that we must never be ignorant in any way whatsoever. I seriously think the film would have done a lot better WITHOUT GUN VIOLENCE. The film should be more Deaf-centered superheroes, funny, witty, and inspiring.

Additional Link:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vFDg_WycklI

-JT

Copyright © 2018 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

Dwight Benedict: Stop the Practice of Discrimination, Shaming, and Cruel Punishment

Is Oralism a Mental Health Issue?

 

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Audism is without question, a mental health issue. The problem is that the mental health of Administration at Illinois School for the Deaf (ISD) devoted to the National Cued Speech Association. It is the mental health of Oralism who see no problem with ISD licensed to infect Audism freely.

Sadly, Deaf community is being challenged by Cued Speech stakeholders chained to the heavy oppression and power status. Do you believe Alexander Graham Bell ignited mental health against Deaf community in the state of Illinois?

-JT

Copyright © 2018 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

Understanding Stigma About Deaf People

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Remember the book I was reading few weeks ago, Stand Up to Stigma: How We Reject Fear and Shame by Pernessa C. Seele–finally finished reading the book and has put many questions that needs to be seen in Deaf community.  Once promoting the culture of stigma means to defame others. At the same time, however, stigma have some kind of social rule in what the members of a society are forced to taught when they are growing up.

The eyes of xenophobia about Deaf people are once again invisible.

One of the most difficult issues for the survivors of stigma is thinking how widespread the stigma is. As bad as stigma in Deaf community may be, where is the direction of making some effort, through community help, to reduce stigma about Deaf people and increase awareness for Deaf people?

In all likelihood, Deaf people have been the survivors of stigma—ignorance in the society. Life had not easy for the lives of Deaf people, their future should have been looked bright. In the spirit of renewed activism and social justice, Deaf people should be generally more willing to share their stories, even if it means suffering in the shadows of stigma.

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Has stigma take a backseat to tolerance or ignorance in today’s society? In the spirit of tiredness activism, are Deaf people generally more willing to express their experiences through the stages of stigma? Even if it means suffering through the acts of stigma and…..hate. Life had not been easy for Deaf people; the future should have been bright for each of them.

Finally, as a form of stigma, what kind of it would serve the society a purpose?

-JT

Copyright © 2017 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.