Fear-Rejection Thoughts Is Not Love

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We do not need fear-rejecting thoughts in Deaf community. If bystanders cannot find anything to recognize bullying, then they have committed a crime. Suicide is a tragic response to bullying. The problem is that it is very rarely discussed in Deaf community.

I am writing about Deaf returning citizens. They could easily take their lives away. Would it be a criminal act if Deaf returning citizens take their own lives if they are severely bullied daily in same Deaf community they live and breathe in? Deaf community loves to bully and would make up rumors that make it look true. Can Deaf community accept the fact that the suicides are the evidence of BIGGER problems than being bullied?

The fear-rejecting about Deaf returning citizens is a huge problem. The bullies would cruelly exploit that social prejudice, and got away with it. There are three important factors that we all need to know and be aware about it.

Number One: Oppression

Number Two: Dehumanization

Number Three: Exploitation

Remember the book, Pedagogy of the Oppressed by Paulo Freire? He once wrote about dehumanization in 1981:

Dehumanization, which marks not only those whose humanity has been stolen, but also (though in a different way) those who have stolen it, is a distortion of the vocation of becoming more fully human….Th[e] struggle [for humanization] is possible only because dehumanization, although a concrete historical fact, is not a given destiny but the result of an unjust order that engenders violence in the oppressors, which in turn dehumanizes the oppressed.”

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Deaf returning citizens have been subject of the oppressed. When bullies are not punished, did they also harm themselves that they intend to do? If a bully crosses the line between hate speech, invasion of privacy, or harassment, is it OK for the bully to harass Deaf returning citizens daily? There are many ways to address bullying, harassment, hate speech, death threats, and stalking.

In Deaf community, it is an international problem. Can we have conversation about the importance of educating love instead of hate? The importance of civility and respect would be more effective tool for Deaf community to heal.

-JT

Copyright © 2018 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

 

 

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Ignorance Continues…..

 

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I was a patient there for a while before I was discharged recently (today) for a heart-related condition. When I found out the sign on the door where I was assigned to be in a room, the ignorance about Deaf people by labelling them “hearing impaired”–a damaging image of Deaf people.

What I do not understand is that hearing people who think they make the best decisions for Deaf people by oppressing emotional experience and reflects the need for understand that Deaf people in our culture and expression of emotion. I mean, Washington, D.C. is the largest Deaf community in America and the home of the world’s only Deaf university and yet, today is 2017–the ignorance still amazes me. Just amazing…

It is an example of how complex oppression is, and why it is not just a hearing perspective of Deaf people on oppression, but a multi-viewed Audism perspective that affects Deaf people all in different ways. When hearing people have every right to label Deaf people “hearing impaired”—Deaf people are not just protesting oppression as Deaf, but as Deaf people with inherent rights, human rights, as well as cultural rights.

-JT

Copyright @ 2017 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

Beyond Labeling: The Role of Awareness

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Once upon a time, a scantily clad less paddling down a river has lacked awareness—at least hundreds of eyeballs eager to continue their glance to help and support stop bullying. In a country’s long history of oppression of Deaf returning/returned citizens (DRCs): San Diego, Chicago, Portland, Baltimore, Jacksonville, Atlanta, Boston, and the big cities.

One of the things that makes labeling so powerful is that the sheer amount of hatred it gathers it makes it possible to encourage what the community as a whole are interested in. The proposal to ban DRCs from the Deaf community has taken many forms over their lifetime. A lifetime scar. It is a collateral damage to DRCs.

By many measures, there is no tougher place to be Deaf in America than Deaf community itself. The overwhelming majority for lack of awareness about DRCs who make up higher proportion of struggle to reclaim their lives, for one, pursuit of happiness. It is a reality that Deaf community do not see or understand about, in part because Deaf community itself often excludes it from nationwide support or news accounts of hatred problem.

DRCs have been known as crazy people with a mentality plantation. Believe it or not, they can make a better example of role models in Deaf community when they are destined to make a good example to turn their lives around. There is a misconception among outsiders about DRCs—they think that those kinds of people do not belong in the society or even Deaf community.

Do DRCs deserve being threatened by things such as deficit thinkers, internalized oppressors, and hatred allowing recognition and bigotry? In the same way, DRCs were instructed to be eliminated by the grim reapers, and mental violence. The result will certainly be a lot of encouragement and perhaps, dislocation. DRCs often face unjustified employment, education, and social barriers. As a Deaf community, should we support all of our DRCs because this support opens the door to opportunity to this population that preserves public safely and provides economically sound results?

We need to utilize awareness to help ensure that DRCs have: (1) access to pursuit of happiness. (2): Direct contact with Deaf community (3): Access to information about the laws that protect DRCs. (4) support DRCs as they search for networking, education, and employment. Consequently, any ban on DRCs would not only further marginalize this population, but would be unwarranted;

I strongly believe that community accountability, and public awareness would benefit greatly from the perspective of DRCs who have direct experience with our criminal justice system and who have lived to tell about it. This sort of action in support for DRCs would provide education for Deaf community even legal community and add to the intellectual, experiential, and cultural diversity with its own community. Research has shown that DRCs who have turned live lives around for the better, are typically the best students, employees, etc. because they value the opportunity.

However, barriers erected by society for this population serve as impediments to sustain education, direct contact with Deaf community, and careers upon return to society. How can we solve this problem? I am not ashamed to inform you that I am a Deaf returned citizen and happen to be the most honest DRC as well to live to tell about it who happened to be the best student in my own courses, Each of it and I am very proud of it! End the mass incarceration! That picture below where I gave a presentation at Gallaudet Univeristy.

 

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-JT

Copyright © 2016 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

 

Starkey Hearing Foundation: Exhibition of the Oppressed

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The first picture of the battery economics product of me for the first time.

The interview between the Daily Moth and California Association of the Deaf (CAD) president Julie Rems Smario and Secretary Deanna Bray was like watching a tennis game. It makes you wonder when the host asks “assonance” style, the term coined to take place when two ore more words close to the sound with the same vowel mix with different consonant sounds. Repeat hearing aids question. Repeat hearing aids question. Repeat hearing aids question.

Like Julie said, “hearing aids is a tool.” The hearing aids was a total waste of my human life for first 15 years—the batteries were a constant bullying against my dignity in school and even in my hometown, too. It is all about battery economics. Julie and Deanna stood fierce to preserve American Sign Language (ASL). They were both warriors of the week.

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1986. Ball! Huh? Ball! Huh? 

Let me make clear on this. I argue against the battery economics why they should make profits off Deaf children. It is not about Deaf children—it is about language deprivation. The hearing aids were a major ache.

Couple of years ago, there was a major TV show, Home Extreme Make Over, came to Oregon to find the perfect spot. Oregon School for the Deaf. Until Sharla Jones, the outreach coordinator who were responsible to make direct flights bound for Starkey Hearing Foundation to take Deaf students in. That was exactly why Julie and Deanna are making great examples to prevent this again from clowns. It is a repeated cycle.

Language acquisition is the best key for higher education. It could have saved a lot of money away from battery economics. I can remember my days when I had no choice to wear hearing aids. One day during summer 1989, as 15 years old kid, I was with my father, brother, and cousin at a river down from my house that time. The river was owned by the family until 1978. That was the same year my mother took me out of Tucker-Maxon Oral School (TMOS) and that was where TMOS pulled a stunt and made me wear hearing aids. I would always remember the chief architect is. It is like born at first birth.

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That was the last time I wore hearing aids on my left ear that summer for good.

TMOS ignored the language acquisition and used a lot of wrenches around my ears to make I command to hear. The wrenches coming out of the tool box to make the staff little richer when they come home and eat dinner with families each night.

After the CAD open letter for Starkey Hearing Foundation, what is more what Starkey Hearing Foundation mission is to label Deaf children of strained leadership. For example, William F. Austin, the Founder, Owner and CEO of Starkey Hearing Foundation was well known for labeling Deaf children to get into power and eventually, an oppressor. Putting hearing aids on Deaf children is a circus quoted in Julie’s words, is powerful.

The foundation has become necessary because it is fun to deliberately cofound Deaf children with the unknown; And to have a good laugh at their expense and ultimately to maintain status quo, ensuring Deaf children remain disempowered while the Starkey Hearing Foundation entertain a new mental plantation.

By not informing parents of Deaf children about ASL, that is all about dirty politics. By putting hearing aids on them for media circus, they simply get confused and by nature they need to go where they could become clear again in the light of new mental plantation to protest Starkey Hearing Foundation. Deaf culture and language is misclassified and misinterpreted. The labels easily mishandled.

The hearing aids—and the battery economics has caused strain in the relationship between me and my father. Sure, it is a nice wish for a change and take the advice that language acquisition on ASL would make a difference in the relationship with my father. I was designed to be a tool.

Are Deaf children still struck in the mud for battery economics? Thank you, Julie and Deanna!

-JT

Copyright © 2016 Jason Tozier

Gallaudet University: Hopes and Aspirations

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Recently, President Bobbi Cordano sent out a letter with 2016 agenda for Gallaudet University. The most important keys are the last three statements:

“Racism, discrimination based on different identities, and other forms of systemic oppression, invest in and strengthen learning and discovery through academic programs, research, and community engagement efforts and celebrate the success of our students, staff, faculty, and alumni.”

Long before becoming president for Gallaudet, Bobbi was a former lawyer whom made a huge difference in Minnesota’s court system to make sure that a policy to provide ASL interpreters for Deaf people in courts is a huge key—but the problem is that there are many bad interpreters who does not even sign fluently or not at all and often ends up putting Deaf people in jail because of their gross negligence. It happens every day in American courts today and tomorrow.

There is plenty of Racism happening in courts where Black Deaf defendants could not defend themselves—on the lack of ASL interpreters. For example, Erica West Oyedele gave a presentation called “Missing Narratives in Interpreting and Interpreter Education” at Registry Interpreters of the Deaf (RID) Conference 2015 in New Orleans discussing lack of diversity within the predominantly White in RID—88% of RID interpreters are white and only 12% of Black or People of Color interpreters.

That raised a huge red flag. When Black Deaf defendants in court use their ASL, would White interpreters understand their language? No, I do not think so. Does White interpreters completely understands Black culture? No, I do not think so. Often Black Deaf would end up in jail by not receiving full accessibility to their language. So are Deaf White defendants, too. They often do not understand due process and end up thrown away without listening to their stories.

Inclusiveness is more complex and challenging but that is Gallaudet University we are talking about. We used to think of inclusiveness in terms of more than six principal groups——Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, CI users, Oralists, ASL users, Black Deaf, Deaf with another Disability, etc.; however there are over 1000 independent thinking students on campus who happen to be Deaf. We have to think about inclusiveness in a totally different way; a more complex approach but I think ultimately far more rewarding. Let’s not just throw out the concept of inclusiveness; let’s question it and more to a more sophisticated and develop approach.

What about Deaf returning citizens? A Returning Citizen is when they re-enter into the society with a second chance whether they are wrongfully convicted or not. At Gallaudet, Deaf Culture is as much a part of the inclusive landscape as anything else and it is ridiculous to try to ignore our language. Deaf Returning citizens cannot be ignored. They have been severely oppressed by Gallaudet University based on discrimination based on different identities, and other forms of systemic oppression.

How come Gallaudet University refuses to invest and strengthen learning for Deaf returned citizens and not to celebrate their success? They view Deaf returning citizens as menace to the society. They practice stereotypes and prejudices without question.

Let’s take a look at Institutionalized Oppression Definitions from Wiki.

“Institutions are fairly stable social arrangements and practices through which collective actions are taken. Examples of institutions in America include the legal, educational, health care, social service, government, media and criminal justice systems.”

The key word: Educational.

“Institutional Oppression occurs when established laws, customs, and practices systemically reflect and produce inequities based on one’s membership in targeted social identity groups. If oppressive consequences accrue to institutional laws, customs, or practices, the institution is oppressive whether or not the individuals maintaining those practices have oppressive intentions. ”

The key word: Oppressive intentions.

Gallaudet University uses overt forms of oppression may be secret, hidden, and not openly practiced targeting Deaf returning citizens. How do we combat it without a notion of what inclusiveness is? Deaf returning citizens live our language, ASL. We can call it Deaf Culture but basically inclusiveness is talking about opportunity for oppression of ASL—the inability to include our language and culture with some kind of meaning. There are not enough academic line that is going to take us through to anything that we feel is worth accomplishing in our own language. That is an oppressive intention.

Inclusiveness is a welcome mat: Everybody is included; of course, it helps a lot if they were white, and hearing. Now I seem to be talking about white and hearing people’s power but that is what we are actually talking about. The fundamental question for inclusiveness is about dividing Deaf Returning citizens.

Inclusiveness is not a failed experiment. It is silly. However, we have to look at it as a reality to be dealt with in terms of white people’s power, which I realize, is a real fallacy, and then there is no real mutual respect. No one at Gallaudet University shall take Deaf returning citizens’ right to higher education away. Labeling is not cool.

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-JT

Copyright © 2016 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only including this copyright message.