The Discussion of Second Chances: Deaf Returnees

“Find ways of sharing the land, of achieving dignity without eradicating the other”- Naomi Chazon

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At the improving myself end of my life, I return home from a trauma stage: telling a story who dealt with an oppressed environment in the hearing world. The majority of the world: hearing. It makes Deaf community built into a minority gambling for human struggle and painful journey.

To the survivors of oppression, those Deaf valiant souls who fought for freedom their whole lives long and never lived to taste its pursuit of happiness; To learn awareness about Deaf returnees, who lived in this strange and cruel land, yet, dreamed more safe without ignorance.

Will Gallaudet University no longer safe because of bullying policies and social values? Where was I shut out of my trauma wiped from my memories of pain for 32 years and of my accomplishments to turn my life around and dealt with hate-mongers?

Labeling heavily regulated because they are federal employees. Regulated for collecting evidence, regulated for search and seizure and regulating on the ideas of profiling. These guidelines need to be followed but sometimes the federal employee does not want to follow the rules, sometimes they want to act like a human. Yes, human have biases and have histories.

In the personal tragedy of what it has happened to me, had been damaged to be enfolded and left to be a scapegoat at will in the eyes of ASL/Deaf Studies, whether our traumas can ever truly be overcome. The answers it offers are denial, deeply rooted in culture of fear, and empty my heart out. Truly broken. It is what it is called siege mentality. Us versus them rhetoric about Deaf returnees.

It is very radicalized—for example, oppressors “police” Deaf returnees, there are expectations that a person is an oppressor. They are considered flash points. If oppressing Deaf returnees on the campus of Gallaudet, what do you call it?

It is a Superman Syndrome. Oppressors are expected to SAVE THE DAY and do everything to everyone. Anti-hate mentality but when oppressors are in trouble and they need the idea of the dual relationships. It is senselessness of bullying. The problems with this type of policing—it is a masculine model, and old school stigma follow and lack of awareness is a big problem.

Let’s exacerbating this idea. Amount of awareness: 100% of educating themselves about Deaf returnees “paid dues to the society”, during the day, the “invisible oppression” and is not regulated, do not have to go by the books, but at night they are regular people by the books.

More about 10,000 Deaf inmates in the United States are invisible. When one let out of prison, only to find that landing a higher education at Gallaudet University is near impossible. In fact, they remain unemployed—often because of the stigma that they carry and concerns over what kind of higher education they would prove to be. It means the awareness of Deaf returnees is three times more invisible and marginalized.

Then lack of awareness goes back to their day job. The Allegory of Deaf returnees—stories that create a meaning that create a meaning beyond the literal level of interpretation.

The rhetoric of supremacism. What is supremacism? It “is an ideology of domination and superiority: it states that a particular class of people is superior to others, and that it should dominate, control, and subjugate others, or is entitled to do it.”

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When I took American Indian Literature for one of my undergraduate requirements, I was asked to read a book called The Lakota Way: Stories and Lessons for Living:

“We Lakota believe that the roads in life, but that there are two that are most important. The Red Road and the Black Road. They represent the two perspectives to every situation, the two sides of every person, the two choices we frequently face in life.

The Red Road is the good way, the good side, and the right choice. It is a narrow road fraught with dangers and obstacles is extremely difficult to travel.

The Black Road is the bad way, the bad side, the wrong choice. It is wide and very easy to travel. The Red Road and the Black Road appear in many of our stories, not as roads but as the personifications of right and wrong, good and bad, light and dark.”

That is something we need to think about. Can Deaf returnees be forgiven and give a second chance? The activity of entering or “invading” the awareness on the part of Deaf returnees is clearly one of struggling subversion. Intended by their visible presence in this clearly showed Gallaudet mecca is limiting between the allowable spaces for Deaf returnee’s search for healing and the rest of Gallaudet campus.

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Left unchallenged in such an action, however, are the hardest ways, besides the awareness about Deaf returnees, in which Deaf returnees feel alienated and excluded from Deaf space.

In the higher learning, it was the contention of oppressors to continue combat this stigma must be regarded as the same source of power that denied Deaf returnees access to higher education. Bullying—long tolerated as just part of growing up—finally has been recognized as a sociological problem.

In 1999, District of Columbia enacted anti-bullying legislation. In addition, research on the causes, consequences, and prevention of bullying has not enough discussed at Gallaudet University. However, major ignorance still exists in the understanding of bullying that could prevent the effects of bullying Deaf returnees. The form of social isolation is another sociological problem. With the right training, Deaf returnees who’ve been returned to the society thrive to hold hunger for higher education even more than your regular American citizen.

Higher education plays an important role in their lives. To empower the strategy of unity through democracy—and to teach them is the most peaceful thing. The spirit of peace and democracy that lacks the Gallaudet community-Deaf returnee agreement is gone, and there is no second chance for how to reverse it and how to cope with it.

Professors regarded as, Person who professes being usually an expert in arts or sciences, a teacher of the highest rank.” Harper, Douglas, “Professor.” Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved 2007-07-28.

Text defines “social movements” as collective attempts to bring about change….” Nothing. They originate OUTSIDE the established political system. Let’s emphasize on interlocking systems of oppression—however that is being conceptualized to it. Perhaps it seems surprising because the society have class, power and other issues to contend with. Deaf returnees are less likely to say that the society needs a movement because they continue to be oppressed.

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All for all, Deaf returnees have constitutional right to seek higher education at Gallaudet and change their lives around to make them better. 8th Amendment and 9th to the United States Constitution respectively: Bails, fines, and punishments“nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.”

Rights retained by the people. “The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be constructed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.”

What is something really important about the relationship between Deaf returnees and Deaf community that we have not discussed in higher learning, and why is it important? Can we find ways of sharing awareness, of achieving dignity without oppressing Deaf returnees at Gallaudet University?

-JT

Copyright © 2018 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

 

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Gallaudet University: ASL/Deaf Studies and Intellectual Property Problem

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Many graduate even undergraduate students at Gallaudet University does not know how to protect copyright their thesis and term papers to be protected their works by notarizing through legal notary. Do you know that Gallaudet University professors can use students’ work without their permission and use it for their own benefit? Since in few weeks, Gallaudet University is about to start soon.

One “so-called” professor in ASL/Deaf Studies was caught by stealing Deaf student’s work and got suspended for a year without pay. There was never “health problem” at all. It was embarrassing and insult to the intellectual property–that become a big problem today. The chair of the department came to save the professor’s face and appealed to have the professor to be allowed to be back into the department and teach again, the professor still ask other students if the professor can use them. That professor is no scholar!

There is a wonderful quote: “…What societies really, ideally, want is a citizenry which will simply obey the rules of society. If a society succeeds in this, that society is about to perish.” James Baldwin, A Talk to Teachers in 1963.

What this means is, if ASL/Deaf Studies project that students fail, they indeed might. But if they encourage and educate them, especially to take the occasional chance and challenge existing knowledge, they could truly advance as a society. This is ASL/Deaf Studies about education of Deaf people. It was found in a study that many Deaf people dreamed of becoming better role models, a profession that requires intellectual property, not mental attributes.

This trend is thought to be because it is so important that Deaf students could never achieve the sort of scholastic success that it would require, for example, to be a professor or a lawyer. Additionally, there are Deaf professors in ASL/Deaf Studies department, yet still retain denial what they knew about this so-called professor. While the chances for anyone to be a Deaf professor are minimal at best, this glamorous image encourages Deaf students subliminally to resign to the intellectual property in their pursuits.

Also, there is a strong education in effect that Deaf students should protect their paper works, that they are perhaps destined for a life of success. This typecast “intellectual property” actually foretells the actual future, because it does not give one a chance to realize their full potential before branding themselves with failure.

The unification of Deaf students doing homework and study hard, there might be a greater encouragement of Deaf culture’s youth to pursue academia, and also an increased higher educational awareness required on the part of the professors. I would support it myself.

Educators, especially at Gallaudet University need to be aware of the consequences of intellectual property, so that Deaf students will get a fair chance to learn.

-JT

Copyright © 2016 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

The Change of Power Dynamics in Department of Interpreting at Gallaudet University

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Interpreting American Sign Language (ASL) and its cultural history has always been a hallmark of Gallaudet University, the world’s only liberal arts university for the Deaf in Washington, DC. The importance of interpretation to the mission of the university has been demonstrates through the years, and the cadre of professors who articulate and facilitate between ASL and its spoken counterpart English today is an essential arm of higher learning.

Not too long time ago, ASL was added to the university bilingual mission statement. Our basic goals for Gallaudet University are to better understand ASL and to infuse this bilingual knowledge into various facets of higher education.

So it is quite appropriate for Gallaudet University to apply ASL to interpretation. It points to a new and growing partnership between the Deaf and interpreters and call for expanding this partnership beyond the university to the many public and private groups that interpret cultural history of the Deaf. This is crucial, because the challenges of a dynamic future of the Deaf will surely place greater demands on professional ASL interpreters. Increased knowledge about ASL-English interpretation.

There are some interpreting majors at Gallaudet who talks and signs known as SIM-COM (simultaneous communication) at the same time oppressing ASL—even talking without ASL in food courts, library, educational classrooms and the Department of Interpreting (DOI) needs to educate interpreting majors that oppressing ASL is the root of the language oppression. Faculty and students at Gallaudet University has offered the same diagnosis, and belated users of ASL themselves regularly assert that Gallaudet University administration has offended Deaf people’s dignity, pride, and honor. That is a branch of ignorance at Gallaudet.

What should we make of it? Can anyone point to a greater language hegemony whom interpreters refuse to learn the power dynamics of Audism where DOI needs to offer a full course about Audism? There is no policy about Audism in DOI. That is a fact. For a modern example of the kind of Deaf community that can be fashioned out of an exclusive reliance upon ASL, who are those people on the Gallaudet administration ostracizing Deaf people for using ASL?

Even though there is no shortage of brilliant minds in the Deaf community, Deaf people are simply oppressed by Gallaudet University—with the newly elected president, Roberta “Bobbi” Cordano that will hopefully make a huge change to reduce the human ignorance and make ASL a primary language all over Gallaudet University campus including interpreting majors or interpreters who should not talk and sign at the same time or talk without ASL is purely offensive for Deaf students on the campus.

-JT

Copyright © 2016 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only including this copyright message.