AGBell: Misunderstanding?

The “quality” of a Deaf child should not be misunderstood by AGBell’s practitioners of Audism, Hate, Surdophobia and Oppression.

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Open Your Eyes: Audism Talking

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I need to admit that it is not easy for me to write this. When you know someone who is a sound-oriented professor, who also “inspires” Deaf people, is extremely rare to see. Deaf students at Gallaudet University are referred to as the future of Deaf community, but without support and opportunities, some fall through the cracks. I am questioning a critical examination done by hearing privileges.

Now, more than ever, we, the Deaf must make a priority to share their experiences to challenge the issue of Audism. To see Deaf people being oppressed invisibility do not have the ground to discuss Audism when hearing people are given higher privileges to talk and use their voice. Is Audism, an invisibility cloak around Deaf people at Gallaudet University?

The state of being Deaf continues to be in the state of an object that cannot be seen. It does not take an expert to understand the detrimental effects that Audism are hurting Deaf people’s well being. From the public standpoint, Audism has provided a serious social problem in Deaf community including Gallaudet University to the point that it affects the way Deaf people learn and thrive.

When Deaf people receive positive academic experience, they should not fear for the oppression from a professor who is hearing, it undoubtedly has a huge effect on the success of Deaf students and Deaf educators alike.

The fact remains that Audism, so easily targeted as uninformed and misguided are becoming the stronger group that would lead the future. How do you feel about someone who used human voice with hearing spouse/partner and refused to use sign language in front of Deaf people? It is not the first time.

Audism Unveiled, Audism: Exploring the Metaphysics of Oppression, Audism and Deaf-Gainseemed promising to me when I first read the book, I found a powerful statement: “The road less traveled, however, is still a road and is becoming more and more traveled as time goes on……the Deaf community faced the fact that the hegemony of the “voice” and “speaking” was precisely what they wanted to ‘speak out’ against.”—Introduction: Open Your Eyes: Deaf Studies Talking

Scenario one: Two hearing people walk into Gallaudet University, sit down, speaks with their voice and is allowed to oppress Deaf people and use the power of hearing privileges. Outcome: Audism.

Multiple reports of Audism occur on Gallaudet University campus. Outcome: Audism. No action against hearing people.

Scenario two: Two Deaf people walk into Gallaudet University, sit down, signs to each other and the outcome is unknown. Think about it.

Over the past decade when I read many books, watched presentations, lectures, and workshops about Audism even I had given my own lectures about Audism few times have changed my life and complete the cultural competency and inclusion. It is best to learn from Deaf people who experience Audism themselves.

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The world’s only Deaf Studies Department—-where did Audism begin? Audism begins and ends with language. That is how it is examined and discussed. Would the chronicle of higher education deny the existence and evidence of Audism because it has never heard Audism before? It can better understand the resistance of the Deaf if it understands the critical events of Audism and other oppression are very much part of language hegemony that supports the power of hearing privileges. Ignoring Audism is unconscious bias. Outcome? You guess.

The question, is what is the effect of Audism on Gallaudet campus? Vulnerability? Is it the vulnerability of Deaf people being oppressed by hearing privileges? Isn’t Audism a human resource to oppress Deaf people’s health and mind? The problem, however, Audism has never taken a clear position enough at Gallaudet University.

-JT

Copyright © 2018 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

Open Your Eyes: Everyday Disempowerment of Deaf People Signing

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In National Association of the Deaf (NAD) Spring 2016, Volume 16, Issue 1 magazine, a feature written beautifully by Trudy Suggs, A Quick Look at Everyday Disempowerment of Deaf People, writes:

The word disempowerment has quite a simple definition for such a powerful concept: to take away power.

There is an important paragraph to focus on, In Disempowerment through ASL:

Are all the Deaf Studies and ASL programs in the nation run by Deaf people? No. “We advertised the position and couldn’t find anyone qualified.” That certainly could be the case. Still, such situations have ripple effects: deaf people aren’t hired, and those outside of the deaf community, in turn, continue to have beliefs and perceptions shaped by hearing people. These hearing people then believe they can educate others about us, rather than bringing in appropriate Deaf community representatives.

At Gallaudet University, the world’s only university for Deaf students to articulate their higher learning experience. The ability to acquire and write stories exclusively is valuable for their life struggles in the field, for example, ASL/Deaf Studies for their knowledge of literacy and they strive to tell their stories actively thinking about hardships they had endured of entering into the harsh world. The truth must be seen. Some people know who Dirksen Bauman is, the only hearing member of ASL/Deaf Studies who happens to be in full charge of the department.

Here are the two videos that will show you what Dirksen really have to say.

“Crazy” people in Deaf Studies who wanted to hire him–I know who it is and it was a Deaf professor who desperately wanted him in just because the professor needed his writing skills and changes the image of ASL/Deaf Studies. That is how Dirksen became a Chair after that. He should be honest with himself why he took the position first place. Like Trudy writes, “Cost-beneficial and cost-effective in the long run? Absolutely.”

The masked man became the version of Socrates. There is a story that needs to be seen. When Dirksen invited Carl Schroeder to be a guest speaker for one of his courses, Carl was signing a story about Cratylus and Dirksen briefly stopped and asked Carl, “You knew about Cratylus?” and Carl was puzzled why he was asked that question. Meaning Carl was the first Deaf person now he knows. He assumed that there was not any other Deaf person to know about it. Perhaps the interpretation might be different. Carl knew about this way before Dirksen published a book, Open Your Eyes: Deaf Studies Talking.

Then Dirksen writes, Even within the field of Deaf Studies, perspectives of Deaf people are often not valued. Many programs call themselves Deaf Studies but are actually based on an audiological model or are focused on deaf education and the strategies for acquiring English.”

Carl became well versed in an area of scholarship other than being Deaf professor, which was unavailable. He was committed himself to teach students very well as I had been his teacher assistant which was a thrilling experience for me. As it turned out, it has been difficult at the basics of the oppression in this society; The course, DST 311: Dynamics of Oppressed, the more Deaf students study books, articles, publications, they should be aware of the oppression documentations that gives Deaf students a chance to grow, and in the sociological oppression, which can supposedly help them what the original oppression were.

The originals of oppression went through a language clash with DST, but the reality is that does Gallaudet University have the originals so saying that a hearing professor have the right to be in charge of DST program? Unless Deaf professors reconstruct the originals of oppression.

Try to revert a basic question: How does it help Deaf students to say that oppression is the inerrant language of the Deaf, if in fact, we do not have a college or university oppressing Deaf students. Gallaudet University ASL/Deaf Studies is one. Once again, the question from the beginning of the post above, “Are all the Deaf Studies and ASL programs in the nation run by Deaf people? No.” In the first video, Dirksen says, “hearing person in Deaf Studies Department? No, it does not make sense.” How come he choose the change of heart?

The post is based on the meaning of the university level awareness is involved and is bit convoluted. This kind of realization coincided with the problems Deaf students encountering the more closely they study oppression. That is exactly why we need to take a quick look at everyday disempowerment of Deaf people.

It is so important that we all are aware of the rights we hold as human who are Deaf.-Trudy Suggs

-JT

Copyright © 2016 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only including this copyright message.

References:

Suggs, Trudy. A Quick Look at Everyday Disempowerment of Deaf People. Spring 2016. Volume 16, Issue 1.

Bauman, H-Dirksen L. Open Your Eyes: Deaf Studies Talking.