GU Interim Provost: Why Dehumanization Matters

#gallaudetuniversity #jefflewis #dehumanization #racism #systemicracism

Interim Provost Jeff Lewis and why dehumanization matters at Gallaudet University. The systemic racism is accepted as an institutional racism to legalize white supremacy.

 

 

The Sociology of Reducing Prejudice

0-12

So much of Racism has been whitewashed for the sake of Gallaudet University to make room for white consumption. As a White Deaf person, I feel embarrassed. The dehumanization of Black Deaf people, it was a cruel punishment which is part of White silence. Why continue legalized punishment? Gallaudet University’s contribution to systemic racism has always to ignore the sanctity of human life. 

One of my favorite Black authors, Charles M. Blow wrote a powerful message:

“Also, I’m sick of explaining racism. You invented it. You should know it better than me.” 

The cap logo: To stand up against bigotry and hate. The face on T-shirt: W.E.B. Du Bois, America’s Intellectual Black Sociologist. Powerful activist. Co-founded the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People [ NAACP ].

History in the making! Walking on Black Lives Matter (BLM) Blvd, America’s first street named in the solidarity of BLM in Washington, D.C. has been a profoundly moving experience and learning from the truths that cannot be taught, only learned through reading stories from the books, it has opened my eyes and heart to continue and to unpack my White privileges in a soul-searching experience.

I have been studying hate crimes for 13 years. I put myself to learn Methodology of the Oppressed course has helped to shape and strengthen from further examining the White Privileges in time-sensitive efforts to support the Black Deaf community and Black Lives Matter.

The dynamics of this methodology taught me how to develop skills necessary for understanding diversity-related issues and content; identifying and consciously constructing ideology; Those kinds of dynamics have been explored as the methodology necessary for handling conflicts.

Before continuing to proceed, the long road to cultural healing, then we must begin by understanding the White Privileges. But here we are faced with consequences, thinking it would be gone, all gone–that is the sociological problem.

Knowledge is power. How does Racism understand and grapple with issues of power? What is the relationship between systemic racism, institutional racism, and internalized racism on the campus of Gallaudet University? In this learning experience, what is the biggest role of standing up against Racism? Gallaudet University has been always a racist system since day one.

We must continue our solidarity to see the stories seen–and continue to fight back with everything we offer. After walking on BLM Blvd in Washington, D.C.; where it was the same location that is the most politically marginalized place anywhere in the United States. It is amazing to see something like this. The thrill of participation is something I will never forget in my life.

I would like to show you the books that I would like to suggest reading. Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin, discussing lynching, white segregation, the second book, Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America by Michael Eric Dyson, tears means cleaning out toxic, white tears need to examine much deeper, the third book, Trust in Black America: Race, Discrimination, and Politics by Shayla C. Nunnally, impacts political life, listen to their struggles, the fourth book, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander, this book is one of my favorites, examine the system, for example, criminal justice targeting Black community, it is a must-read, it would make you unpack White privileges so deep enough to understand deep-rooted Racism;

The fifth book, Living With Racism: The Black Middle-Class Experience by Joe R. Feagin & Melvin P. Sikes, listening to their painful stories through Black experience, sufferings, struggles, and the laundry list and that is where that leads to examine the White privileges. The sixth book, Uprooting Racism: How White People Can Work for Racial Justice by Paul Kivel, teaching White people how to resist Racism.

Finally, the seventh book, The Many Costs of Racism by Joe R. Feagin & Karyn D. McKinney, that book is about Black families, Black workers, Black experience, many to list, and how the cost could impact the lives of the Black community in the age of Racism, and that is where it would require White privileges must continue to examine, most importantly, critically. 

0-13

-JT

Copyright © 2020 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

YouTube link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=siZ6FH4UAqo

Stand in Solidarity with Black Deaf Community and Black Lives Matter!

Keep up the solidarity against the inhumane conditions targeting Black Deaf community and Black community for years and years. Enough! More than ever, our support needs to spread the powerful impact at what may be one of the most critical timing right now in our lifetime for the future of America.

Dear Joel Barish: Acknowledging the White Privileges

images-1

Dear Mr. Joel Barish:

I would like to applaud Mr. Joel Barish for acknowledging the White privileges and power-tripping being preserved to hide a sociological problem of the damage control; However, when Mr. Joel Barish wrote, “Our hands were intended to block multiple cameras…” that was a good defense, and if necessary to avoid the acknowledgment of inflicting pain for the memories of Nazism, it is too great, and how often do we see the pose of Nazi salute in repeated cycles and becoming a bystander is hard enough.

With the utmost respect for the human rights of the Deaf, can we acknowledge for all of the Deaf survivors from the Nazi regime who have their dignity bulldozed by the ignorance? They had been subjected to cost-benefit practice to deny the existence of a “sacred fire of liberty” is something we cannot ignore.

The struggle for freedom feeling exiled from human rights is difficult to swallow. Understanding for the human rights to describe the human struggle–what does not appear in their struggles is being ignored easily?

Let us look at the everyday life of the Deaf, especially Deaf survivors of the Nazi era, and recognize the lack the knowledge of hate crime and how to develop the layers of sympathy, tolerance, and compassion. The goal of this compassion is to help to defeat the hate in our community who are potentially living and operating in a hostile environment to survive and thrive in that environment today and tomorrow.

Helping the member of the Deaf community understand how they can transition from being a bystander of a bias incident to becoming an active bystander and respect Deaf survivors from the Nazi regime. The pain was too destructive. The force is with them. They are real-time heroes.

Much of the destructive, painful stories the society had practiced hate crime, the forgotten stories of Deaf survivors from the Nazi regime is due to the widely practiced oppression that would be more likely to repeat history.

What does this society was actually doing does not contribute with the headline with community responsibility to discuss hate crime that harms Deaf survivors of the Nazi regime? Human prosperity, knowledge, and happiness, will find in our quest and insights somewhere on how those goals can be achieved—and on what stands on the way of Deaf people.

Like society who never takes enough community accountability by discussing the news or educational discourses just because there is nothing else to write or discuss. The human element is, of course, important of our lives in this regard we can teach each other how to minimize hate crime. There is not much sympathy in this society, and we can make sympathy to prioritize justice all over.

America is the number one geographical of hate crime. Hate crime is deeply entrenched in our society. Silencing Deaf people is deeply rooted, too. At the start of empowering, we need to educate the tendency of oppression for the sake of white privileges. Much empowerment goes into maintaining cultural standards—get siphoned off any empowerment for challenging hate.

Nazi salute should not be an opportunity to target vulnerability in the Deaf space, and the bias is pretty serious not to ignore the problem. Allowing a culture of fear is very complicated more than we understand.

There is no denial in that, we do not need Nazi sympathizers unchecked, and we can effectively challenge White privileges. There are most books I’ve read below including Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi. One of my all-time favorites was The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander.

 

0-9

To the highest standard of compassion, I think Mr. Joel Barish would understand the better road. Who says that Mr. Joel Barish is an expert on hate crime? Distressing and damaging? So much for “committed to fighting for a society in which white privilege and power will no longer exist” in his words. As well as much in his own words for far from “equitable country, and I am committed to fighting for a society in which white privilege and power will no longer exist.”

As the only Deaf lecturer with strong knowledge focusing on hate crimes in the Deaf community. My passion has been burning the flames since 2007. My proudest achievement was to help hate-crime law protecting Deaf Oregonians was passed in 2012.

We live in a culture of fear. What we now identify as “hate crime” has been part of our culture for centuries, only it wasn’t recognized.

Please visit my website should you be interested in hate crimes.

https://jasontozier.net/

-JT

Copyright © 2020 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.