Five Years Later: Carl Schroeder’s Ongoing Influence

Five years ago today, Carl Schroeder passed away. We need to remember the birthright what Carl did for Gallaudet University 30 years ago and today. He inspired the spectators on the night before the students and other people marched to the Mayflower Hotel. Even Fred Weiner shared this story for DPN25: The 7 Ducks Behind the DPN Movement produced and narrated by Benjamin Jarashow. Please see the picture of video below:

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Fred Weiner signs: “I knew there would be just disruption. We were in, ah, the auditorium,………I mean, Carl was talking to students. The very first time when we saw them, we thought, oh, my gosh there is no control here. The three of us went into the corner and started talking about this.

That’s actually the picture that you see published in “When The Week the World Heard Gallaudet. I mean it just exploded. It blew up. From that point on, I warned people, this is going to get crazy. If you pick Zinser it is over and there were people who questioned that. But I knew from that moment.” [You can find the video online]

The picture right here below.

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If it were not for Mayflower Hotel, it would not be Carl Schroeder. The people, who were part of the march, became the face of Deaf identity. It was a flip switch for a light bulb. As in the days of hearing oppression against Deaf people until 1988, seemed to change the history out into the open.

Carl Schroeder stirred Deaf America’s melting pot of language war and oppressors emerged. It was not just the pride of Deaf identity, Deaf people had been found themselves as targets of identity oppression for the hearing status—both on the campus and in real life.

He delivered the message as it was time to make Gallaudet—to break the glass ceiling and gave Deaf people to overcome outrage in the hearing world, which helped them to overcome the oppression movement.

It was one of the most important display of Deaf President Now (DPN) in America, who had long felt safe in the Gallaudet community even as they dealt with the struggles since Milan Resolution 1880 for the practice of rhetoric and Audism acts in Deaf community.

Carl Schroeder, your contribution to DPN and its congregation, was very important 30 years ago and today, as with Deaf America, the importance of storytelling will never disappear and respectfully, heal.

-JT

Copyright © 2018 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

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What’s the Best Qualification for Dean of Student Affairs at Gallaudet?

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The Search Committee is currently looking for a new Dean of Student Affairs at Gallaudet University. It must be not someone who is very much attached to Gallaudet University, for example, fraternity ties, and white privileged Deaf men.

I am very glad that they’ve picked two Deaf people of color on the committee and it is critical moment. The candidate should be non-white, because Gallaudet University has been always dominant in white supremacy and we all know that. We cannot deny that. It is time for a major change.

However, I am very concerned about Lauri Rush, who is very much biased. Under her watch, she failed to stop suicides at Gallaudet University. There was couple of suicides under her watch that she rejected those innocent Deaf students who were seeking help psychologically and emotionally because she was too lazy and too judgmental.

Why is she on the search committee in the first place? Why is she still the director for Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)? She was very much supportive of Dwight Benedict’s actions even though she knew it was criminal act and got away with it.

There were some words around the campus that Carl Pramuk might take the helm, again, he would do anything to protect fraternity boys at any cost. Again, another white privileged Deaf with fraternity ties. Especially rape culture.

Not only that, but also there were some talk that Tommy Horejas, he was so dumb that he does not even successfully understand the foundation of Sociology and Criminology. He once taught class at Gallaudet University: Sociology 220: Sociology of Deaf and Deafness and he told the class why the high percentage of Deaf people divorced because they switched to lesbian or gay lifestyle. No, it was LOVE! He is so dumb. Please do not let him take the position.

Dwight was the biggest predator of all in the history of Gallaudet campus. He let those boys got away with it. Not even one with criminal charge. It is all because he had the power as Dean of Student Affairs. By the way, Dwight could not write at all. He paid late Carl Schroeder to do all of his homework. I am not kidding. Dwight really cannot write at all. A third grader writes better than him in real life. He got away with it. Fucking lucky asshole.

He is also biggest racist in real life. He told a Deaf Black female student not to walk like Black and got her suspended from Gallaudet University with Persona Non Gratia (PNG) for five years just because she was walking like Black. It was so racist that Dwight laughed his ass off. What he did was a hate crime. There are more real-life stories that you do not know how much racist and sexist Dwight was.

I am deeply concerned about the ability of Dean of Student Affairs to confront the many challenges it faces both honesty and not to let criminal acts got away. Not the example of a bully just like Dwight Benedict was.

My concern has been compounded by the failure exhibited by the current university administration to understand the nature of integrity of critical thinking in problem solving without bias. This disdain for Gallaudet University is aggravated by the excessive influence of bullying and oppressive practices by Dean of Student Affairs.

The New Dean of Student Affairs must be:

-Must not be a white Deaf fraternity ties

-Must be outside of Gallaudet

-Deaf

-Must not inside Gallaudet propaganda

-Collective goals

-Believability and credibility

-Not fear-monger

-Stop favoritism

-Stop elitism

-Truth

-Fairness

-Academic Freedom

-Constitutionality

-Justice

-Equality Under the Law

The laundry list goes on.

-JT

Copyright © 2018 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Discussion of Second Chances: Deaf Returnees

“Find ways of sharing the land, of achieving dignity without eradicating the other”- Naomi Chazon

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At the improving myself end of my life, I return home from a trauma stage: telling a story who dealt with an oppressed environment in the hearing world. The majority of the world: hearing. It makes Deaf community built into a minority gambling for human struggle and painful journey.

To the survivors of oppression, those Deaf valiant souls who fought for freedom their whole lives long and never lived to taste its pursuit of happiness; To learn awareness about Deaf returnees, who lived in this strange and cruel land, yet, dreamed more safe without ignorance.

Will Gallaudet University no longer safe because of bullying policies and social values? Where was I shut out of my trauma wiped from my memories of pain for 32 years and of my accomplishments to turn my life around and dealt with hate-mongers?

Labeling heavily regulated because they are federal employees. Regulated for collecting evidence, regulated for search and seizure and regulating on the ideas of profiling. These guidelines need to be followed but sometimes the federal employee does not want to follow the rules, sometimes they want to act like a human. Yes, human have biases and have histories.

In the personal tragedy of what it has happened to me, had been damaged to be enfolded and left to be a scapegoat at will in the eyes of ASL/Deaf Studies, whether our traumas can ever truly be overcome. The answers it offers are denial, deeply rooted in culture of fear, and empty my heart out. Truly broken. It is what it is called siege mentality. Us versus them rhetoric about Deaf returnees.

It is very radicalized—for example, oppressors “police” Deaf returnees, there are expectations that a person is an oppressor. They are considered flash points. If oppressing Deaf returnees on the campus of Gallaudet, what do you call it?

It is a Superman Syndrome. Oppressors are expected to SAVE THE DAY and do everything to everyone. Anti-hate mentality but when oppressors are in trouble and they need the idea of the dual relationships. It is senselessness of bullying. The problems with this type of policing—it is a masculine model, and old school stigma follow and lack of awareness is a big problem.

Let’s exacerbating this idea. Amount of awareness: 100% of educating themselves about Deaf returnees “paid dues to the society”, during the day, the “invisible oppression” and is not regulated, do not have to go by the books, but at night they are regular people by the books.

More about 10,000 Deaf inmates in the United States are invisible. When one let out of prison, only to find that landing a higher education at Gallaudet University is near impossible. In fact, they remain unemployed—often because of the stigma that they carry and concerns over what kind of higher education they would prove to be. It means the awareness of Deaf returnees is three times more invisible and marginalized.

Then lack of awareness goes back to their day job. The Allegory of Deaf returnees—stories that create a meaning that create a meaning beyond the literal level of interpretation.

The rhetoric of supremacism. What is supremacism? It “is an ideology of domination and superiority: it states that a particular class of people is superior to others, and that it should dominate, control, and subjugate others, or is entitled to do it.”

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When I took American Indian Literature for one of my undergraduate requirements, I was asked to read a book called The Lakota Way: Stories and Lessons for Living:

“We Lakota believe that the roads in life, but that there are two that are most important. The Red Road and the Black Road. They represent the two perspectives to every situation, the two sides of every person, the two choices we frequently face in life.

The Red Road is the good way, the good side, and the right choice. It is a narrow road fraught with dangers and obstacles is extremely difficult to travel.

The Black Road is the bad way, the bad side, the wrong choice. It is wide and very easy to travel. The Red Road and the Black Road appear in many of our stories, not as roads but as the personifications of right and wrong, good and bad, light and dark.”

That is something we need to think about. Can Deaf returnees be forgiven and give a second chance? The activity of entering or “invading” the awareness on the part of Deaf returnees is clearly one of struggling subversion. Intended by their visible presence in this clearly showed Gallaudet mecca is limiting between the allowable spaces for Deaf returnee’s search for healing and the rest of Gallaudet campus.

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Left unchallenged in such an action, however, are the hardest ways, besides the awareness about Deaf returnees, in which Deaf returnees feel alienated and excluded from Deaf space.

In the higher learning, it was the contention of oppressors to continue combat this stigma must be regarded as the same source of power that denied Deaf returnees access to higher education. Bullying—long tolerated as just part of growing up—finally has been recognized as a sociological problem.

In 1999, District of Columbia enacted anti-bullying legislation. In addition, research on the causes, consequences, and prevention of bullying has not enough discussed at Gallaudet University. However, major ignorance still exists in the understanding of bullying that could prevent the effects of bullying Deaf returnees. The form of social isolation is another sociological problem. With the right training, Deaf returnees who’ve been returned to the society thrive to hold hunger for higher education even more than your regular American citizen.

Higher education plays an important role in their lives. To empower the strategy of unity through democracy—and to teach them is the most peaceful thing. The spirit of peace and democracy that lacks the Gallaudet community-Deaf returnee agreement is gone, and there is no second chance for how to reverse it and how to cope with it.

Professors regarded as, Person who professes being usually an expert in arts or sciences, a teacher of the highest rank.” Harper, Douglas, “Professor.” Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved 2007-07-28.

Text defines “social movements” as collective attempts to bring about change….” Nothing. They originate OUTSIDE the established political system. Let’s emphasize on interlocking systems of oppression—however that is being conceptualized to it. Perhaps it seems surprising because the society have class, power and other issues to contend with. Deaf returnees are less likely to say that the society needs a movement because they continue to be oppressed.

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All for all, Deaf returnees have constitutional right to seek higher education at Gallaudet and change their lives around to make them better. 8th Amendment and 9th to the United States Constitution respectively: Bails, fines, and punishments“nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.”

Rights retained by the people. “The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be constructed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.”

What is something really important about the relationship between Deaf returnees and Deaf community that we have not discussed in higher learning, and why is it important? Can we find ways of sharing awareness, of achieving dignity without oppressing Deaf returnees at Gallaudet University?

-JT

Copyright © 2018 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

 

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Big Scandal out of Gallaudet University

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Big news out of Gallaudet University–one Deaf high ranking official in administration is suspended and on leave pending investigation on a serious charge. One had been asked to leave–and another one had been fired. Both are Deaf. There may be some more Gallaudet employees who might be fired, asked to leave and many others in the future soon. Some of them are well-known. Huge news. Is it time to clean up corruption at Gallaudet University?

-JT

Copyright © 2018 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message

 

Allegory of Deaf Returnees: The Opposite of Hate

 

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After watching ACLU video about the treatment of imprisoned Deaf and Deaf returnees in Georgia, I understood the pain myself. We must understand that the law requires humane treatment of Deaf prisoners. When I was jailed almost 25 years ago, I was placed what was called pod known as C-2. It housed around 50, 60 inmates. Only 15 beds were offered, so the majority of inmates slept on the floor. I was 21 years old that time. Now I am 43 years old.

The first 15 minutes of living in jail system, I got in huge fight with three big inmates who were calling me names and placing death threats, and broke my hand. I was given aspirin for it. Nothing else. I had to be forced and learned how to toughen it up.

I remember I asked for ASL interpreter, written down on note, and it was rightfully violated—as I remember one of the jail staff, knew that I was Deaf, and became the target of harassing through shame and shaming even attempts at shaming more. It was nothing but a shame revival as a force.

Once I was thrown into a solitary confinement known as “hole” for 72 hours just for protecting a Deaf inmate. I stood strong while I was in there. How did it happen? Inmates from C-2 were given one hour to play table pool, and this Deaf inmate was standing on red line where people were not supposed to stand there.

He could not understand what jail staff were talking to him and forced him to lip-read, then I walked up to him and explained to him in ASL, then one of the jail staff, happened to be the same officer who were targeting me, roughed me up against the wall to mind my own business. Other inmates did not like that what they saw and they were on my side. Then I was thrown into hole.

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Then later, I became very sick for nine days and asked to see nurse also I also asked for ASL interpreter, of course, denied as usual. The nurse gave me aspirin and water. My temp was 104 degrees. The treatment of Deaf prisoners exists.

While I was very sick, I had to survive myself. All I had to drink Kool-Aid and could not able to eat much for the last nine days, even though there were few inmates who came up to me and gave up their Kool-Aid out of respect and they knew that I was damn sick as fuck.

Finally, I felt better after nine long brutal days, then about few weeks before my release, I fought for my rights to get captions on TV, it took me many months to fight and won. That morning, there were two men from jail staff came in and installed captions there, I was standing there smiling and other inmates looked at me, “Right on!” and later, I was chosen to be a trustee in C-2 cleaning, serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and messenger for inmates before my release.

I had very difficult time getting access to TTY—only that I must wait until after 5 PM, but my lawyer’s office closes at 5 PM. They said to me, “Fuck off” and deal with it. When I use TTY, a jail staffer would stand next to me and read what I type. Seriously. Word for word.

Then the hardest part: the brutal treatment of Deaf returnee in society. Eight years on probation, like I wrote in other post, around 97% of time, I was denied for ASL interpreter, only if it is emergency meetings, or polygraph tests.

I was forced to write down on notes, and lip-read—if I do not comply or cooperate with probation officials, I was warned with eight years in prison is on thin ice for me if I do not comply. Writing about my experience became at stroke of a pen that we all know that pen is mightier than sword.

As a Deaf returnee in the making, I had been the biggest target of an online bullying campaign that they wanted to derail me badly, crashing my livelihood, and mental stability by the personal attacks. Shame is not healthy, it is a targeted emotion, which makes Deaf returnees challenging. Is the society on the full scale of anger? Encouraging culture of fear would solve solution? We need to understand the core of shaming.

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Right before deadly heart attack at Gallaudet University on November 8, 2016: the most important question in the history of Gallaudet, I asked in the front audience will be always forever remembered. Room 1011. The question, “Why did Gallaudet University encourage fear targeting Deaf returnees?” then I was dead for ten minutes. They do not want the public to know the truth. I am a living testimony of personal shame and humiliation. Will the living of testimony of support happen? The history of Gallaudet is famous for bullying, shaming, and ostracized.

Flash. Flash. Flash. Then I came back to life. I challenge scholars themselves to be educated about how to define shaming itself, and particularly about whether to emphasize my experience of shame in my own journey. The treatment of Deaf returnees exists. Bashing does not work. Love is what is most important right now. Hate is not.

Yes, Gallaudet University will be always a hate-crime, hate-speech, and hate-literature campus. How can we improve the treatment of Deaf returnees at Gallaudet University? Department of ASL/Deaf Studies comes in many forms, and it is surprising how much of shaming practices from the department bringing an army of trolls causing real psychological damage. Where is the opening examination of shaming?

-JT

Copyright © 2018 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.