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Tag Archives: Deaf Counseling Center

Can Deaf Returning Citizens Exist Without Deaf Community?

 

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Can Deaf returning citizens exist without Deaf community? I do not think so. I believe that is important for information, knowledge, and communication. No one can take away the attribution of success and breach human rights. Bringing awareness about the term of “Returning Citizen” would make all difference.

No more “felons”—no more “convicts”—no more “offenders”—no more negativity. Returning citizen is a positive term. Can Deaf returning citizens deserve to be let alone to resume their life without the haters breathing down their necks? It goes way too far in the continuous punishment. As a nation, I believe that the failure of ignoring hard facts and expert opinions to be discussed in many public policy issues even in Deaf community.

When you see someone bully a Deaf returning citizen, how will you react to it? Does it make it an impressive train wreck? Makes you feel good about it?

I can bully and make Deaf returning citizens ashamed….I bring hatred to their faces…I make them cover their faces by how cyber-bullying can solve problems. I am the greatest bully, and they are inferior. I can do a good job by teaching bullies because it is awesome feeling to do this!”

Have we forgot about the importance of liberty and justice for all? Remember, the society has been trying to teach us the awareness of how to stop bullying including cyber-bullying and end the same way: suffer and humiliation. Do we really understand the Eighth Amendment to the United States Constitution: Cruel and Unusual Punishment?  This is the real epidemic out there that needs to be addressed and examined. Break the stigma.

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Please be aware about October as National Bullying Prevention Month. If you know someone who is a Deaf returning citizen who is in need for counseling for well-being, please feel free to get in touch with Deaf Counseling Center for more information.

http://www.deafcounseling.com/contact-us/

-JT

Copyright © 2017 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

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Deaf Counseling Center Offers Free Hurricane and Fire Crisis Counseling

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A very big heart of them to offer their time to do this. If you need counseling, Deaf Counseling Center can help you out with this.

http://www.deafcounseling.com/free-hurricane-fire-crisis-counseling/

http://www.deafcounseling.com/contact-us/

 

World Mental Health Day: The Modern Struggle For Deaf Returning Citizens

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I would like to share my reflections about World Mental Health Day yesterday (October 10th). My apologies not for finishing up a post on time. It is very important to share more awareness about mental health that impacts Deaf community—especially Deaf returning citizens in Deaf community.

Depression is part of mental health; the stigma connected with Deaf returning citizens is unbearable. The public consciousness about Deaf returning citizens has been a failure of an evolving cultural understanding of mental health among them.

The phrases may haunt them each day. All these years later, they may be struck with shame. The state of being Deaf returning citizens was an “easy job” to ignore and not reported as violating their human dignity and thrown away on the side of the road where the cars would run over them. There was no raised questions from mental health professionals who are hearing who claimed that they are experts in understanding Deaf world. It makes things worse.

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Today, there is ONLY ONE Deaf-centered counseling center in America, Deaf Counseling Center. Without Deaf mental health experts (bless them!), Deaf returning citizens would feel paralyzed whether to share their struggles or not. There is a quote that should be seen:

Should you find yourself the victim of other people’s bitterness, ignorance, smallness or insecurities. Remember this, things could be much worse. You could be one of them.”-Unknown.

Mental health awareness helps to distract all the negative labels in their lives by getting themselves involved with educational jaunts, and Deaf-centered licensed therapists. Is it fair to use a distasteful mental image to prove a point, even if that mental image relies on stereotyping of Deaf returning citizens?

Labeling hurts the most. Mental health awareness can make all the difference to understand the gravity of their experiences. In the Deaf community, there are plenty of hardships that Deaf returning citizens suffer and even think it is OK to bully other Deaf returning citizens who were going through what they had been through. Deaf community ranks one of the highest percentage—lack of mental health awareness and educate the most serious consequences they would face with.

-JT

Copyright © 2017 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

Political Aspects of Deaf Returned Citizens

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There has been a lot of political aspects of Deaf returned citizens life that are connected through their attitudes. In the society America breeds, Deaf returned citizens are being punished for their social, emotional needs and unraveling the fear.  I must first preface my state of being by asserting that I am 100% Deaf. I am not a licensed lawyer, but been beholder for quite long time after doing extensive research with my vigorous heart on this project by acquiring necessary accommodations for their optimal education experience continues to challenge Deaf returned citizens today.

Instead of exploiting myself and trying to present a life that allows people to feel tolerant and open-minded I present the struggles and triumphs of my life in a human way. There are good days and bad days. Sometimes people are insensitive. Hypersensitivity is not what Deaf people are seeking. The points brought up on the curbing of “disability” by sterilization are still pertinent to today and current practices.

It is evident from my experience that the field of Deaf Studies has not come to a head. There is more work to be done in order to make it so that the individuals who are not exploited in Literature and Film, but portrayed and seen as equals to individuals not exhibiting Deafhood. Being exposed to early literature and film makes one aware that even with vast improvements in rights and advantages that the Deaf people enjoy, there are still negative mentalities that have not been eliminated.

From Paddy Ladd, the author of Understanding Deaf Culture: In Search of Deafhood said that ” Deafhood is a process by which Deaf individuals come to actualize their Deaf identity, positing that those individuals construct that identity to their heightened forms by various forms such as nation, era, and class

For people who do not understand what Deafhood is—it means a process, a journey for all Deaf people. In better terms, the measurement is not required for who is Deaf or who is not. In advanced terms, it is not state, which focuses on people’s existential stances.

I would like to thank all the people who provided a support network to me as I struggle through my daily challenges. I feel overwhelmed with grief that had descended into depression. For the first time in a long time, I wonder how I would survive without the few people in my life who truly supportive.

In addition, I would like to thank Deaf Counseling Center (DCC) and it was a blessing for the center to be part of my life progress.

Without the guidance of DCC, I realized that I was self-medicating for the spiral of negative events that plagued me. Long before DCC came into my life, back in Oregon, I had difficulty finding professional counseling help to find an interpreter for me during my subsequent appointments and my appointments were delayed several weeks. With Deaf licensed professional therapists at DCC, I had been experiencing positive results with treatment, my therapy is still relatively new.

Even so, I find myself hopeful for my continued progress in my life. Today, there are thousands of Deaf returned citizens who are struggling with their lives without help of Deaf-centric counseling, they are not alone. They need to have some notion that they need to have some conceptualization of what they are to the community around us before they can comfortable live in the society. All people share this desire.

For example, they had been denied from the society along with the true sense of belonging. Their experiences have become an important part of their lives through “society” policies and laws that systematically oppressed them.

With this notion in place, the society needs to learn the social practices to centralize these oppositions and deconstruct Deaf returned citizens for the betterment of democracy, respect, and genuine appreciation of Deaf people.

-JT

Copyright @ 2017 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

References:

http://tipjones.com/uncategorized/4-quick-tips-to-overcome-fear/

“Retarded” Stigma in American Culture

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Donald Trump called Marlee Matlin “retarded”—a derogatory term in broadest human mind. That makes Trump a deficit thinker and a bully, too. The proof of torture and cruelty on Deaf people is overwhelming and incontrovertible. detailing an unlawful practice that was far more brutal and unnecessary than previously known.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2016/10/13/donald-trump-called-deaf-apprentice-marlee-matlin-retarded.html

Among the abusive tactics by Trump on many people has forced stressed positions, torturing and depriving Deaf people’s civil rights which has resulted in long-last psychological pain and suffering—in addition to deal with emotional trauma is the most dangerous thing when they were growing up and deal with bullying in schools. The link would be helpful to read:

http://www.deafcounseling.com/sticks-and-stones-bullying-and-deaf-people/

Mr. Donald Trump is entitled to a full, public accounting of the torture and cruelty done in his name and the consequences of his actions. I write upon to write this and stop hate-motivated attitude toward Deaf people who work hard to change their lives around to destigmatize them as Deaf people. No more “retarded”—Deaf people are still the most marginalized group practiced by torture and abuse and should not be subjected to harsh conditions.

“Retarded”—is also a hate speech then his behavior becomes weak. In our human minds, we see a bully walking past the street, and the bully sneer at us, then will become invariably disappear. To our human mind, the awareness works. The goal is to teach people awareness who calls Deaf people “retarded” like Mr. Trump did, and it is vital that we need to manage the toxic environment to prevent this from happening.

Hate is about conflict. Conflict with themselves. It shows hate embodied with all of these other personalities; they are faces that seem to struggle with themselves despite being callous to their own experiences. It is a strange paradox that screams out of depth and power in pure, unadulterated self-reflection.

Deaf people who taught how to self-hate for being Deaf even calling other Deaf people “retarded”, it is the most focal key of the invisible hate like a core. Self-hate has scratches all over Deaf people that force the viewers to do two things: recognize the depths in the face and examine the sociological problem. Each scratch has a layer of contrasting pain underneath the first skin layer.

Marlee Matlin do not deserve something like this at all. Shame on Donald Trump!

-JT

Copyright © 2016 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

Link: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2016/10/13/donald-trump-called-deaf-apprentice-marlee-matlin-retarded.html

http://www.deafcounseling.com/sticks-and-stones-bullying-and-deaf-people/

Task Force for the Creation of Deaf Culturally Competent Training for Service Providers of Deaf Children Survivors of Sexual Assault

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I submit the accompanying request for proposal, “Task Force for the Creation of Deaf Culturally Competent Training for Service Providers of Deaf Children Survivors of Sexual Assault”, to implore the creation of a specific Task Force dedicated to improving first responder services to Deaf children survivors of sexual assault.

Deaf children have a unique set of barriers to accessing services when a violent has been committed against them. Many agencies may not have a uniform policy for dealing with Deaf children and their staff may lack a core cultural competence necessary for understanding the unique barriers faced by those survivors. Due to their unique barriers, Deaf children survivors under-report crimes perpetrated against them. The creation of a Task Force to implement a comprehensive training for medical providers, law enforcement, social service advocates, will improve Deaf children survivors’ access to service.

I would like to present an executive summary along with the research that shows that 50% of Deaf children will be sexually assaulted in their lifetime. Deaf children are more likely than hearing children to be survivors of violent crimes. It is certainly demonstrates the enormous psychological and physical impact on Deaf children survivors of sexual assault.

Despite this data, research specific to the prevalence to Deaf children survivors has not adequately been addressed.  Studies do suggest that violent sexual crimes against Deaf children are under-reported.  Deaf cultural competence, specialized services, and improved means of communication with Deaf children survivors will result in more effective service interventions.

Deaf children survivors of sexual assault face special barriers to accessing services. Deaf children survivors suffer from inefficient agency communication systems, and a general provider lack of awareness of the cultural lens of Deafhood and Deaf communities. Deafhood discourses shows that in Paddy Ladd’s book, Understanding Deaf Culture: In Search of Deafhood, political and administrative discourses, academic discourses, specialist discourses, medical discourses, scientific discourses, and media discourses. There is more to this—colonialism and 20th century Deaf Divisions: Linguistic colonialism, colonialism as loss of history and traditions, colonialism and mental health must not be forgotten.

Hooks writes, “For most minority cultures, then, retaining and maintaining a strong historical self is crucial to their pride and to their ability to resist majority-culture constructs of what they should be.”

Ladd writes in page 321, “In Deaf minority cultures, because 90% of parent-child relations are ‘cross-cultural’, the role of Deaf history as transmitted through the education system is of particularly crucial import. Its removal or denial can arguably have especial significance for the mental health of the individual….” The key point is CRUCIAL IMPORT. That is why it is in BOLD statement.

The image below shows that Deaf children are the missing pieces to the real world—they do not simply exist in the real world as shown in Nancy Rourke’s painting, “The Missing Piece”.

themissingpieceMEDAs a result, Deaf children survivors endure increased isolation and under-report crimes committed against them. Deaf children survivors can be more effectively served through development of a special Task Force spearheaded by the county in your area, to specially train front line staff whose assist Deaf children survivors in crisis.

Wherever the county you are in, can partner with local governmental, and social service agencies to encourage, through specialized training, highly skilled staff advocates knowledgeable on the special issues affecting Deaf children that may prevent them from seeking help.

The advocacy skills learned through the trainings will positively enable agents from law enforcement, hospitals, the justice department and child protective services to more effectively communicate with Deaf children in crisis in the greater area, and provide a culturally competent delivery of service that is accessible and comprehensive.

The report introduction shows that there are not enough integrated resources to assist Deaf children of violent sexual crimes. Lack of understanding of the unique experiences of these survivors, their history of frustration to accessing adequate services after a crime as occurred, results in barriers to services to these children. The creation of a Task Force to implement a comprehensive training for medical providers, law enforcement, social service advocates, will improve Deaf children survivors’ access to service.

With the analysis of data, since there is Department of Justice’s National Crime Victimization has added, I certainly hope that 50% of Deaf children who experiences sexual assault be recognized in there similar to Hate Crimes Statistics Act of 1990. In addition, Deaf children are more likely than hearing children to be survivors of childhood sexual assault and continue to feel the effects of rape or assault well after the crime has been committed. I was one of them when I was ten years old and I am still feeling the effects of it at age of 40. I had been suffering from depression, and abuse alcohol to cover my pain is evident enough to experience Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

Despite the alarming rates of sexual assault against Deaf children, very little research examines the rates at which Deaf children are sexually assaulted. Less formal research examines whether Deaf children survivors seek help after the crime, who assists them, and how service providers and law enforcement can best respond. More research is needed to fully understand the scope of sexual assault and its prevalence in Deaf communities.

Moreover, additional research of community response to Deaf children survivors is necessary to create an understanding of sexual assault in the Deaf community and develop an appropriate systemic service response. Deaf children who are survivors of sexual assault differ from the experience of hearing survivors.

In addition to the stigma and stereotypes placed on them as survivors, Deaf children also deal with the additional stereotypes attributed to them via their Deaf status. Their feelings of shame and embarrassment multiply due to belonging to a close-knit Deaf cultural community. Deaf children are hesitant to report crimes, especially if the perpetrator belongs to the Deaf community. Reporting could publicize their survivor’s status within this community, which Deaf children often perceive will be unsupportive. As a result, the sexual assault can produce a profound feeling of isolation.

Another barrier stems from the failure of our hearing-based culture to recognize Deaf children. Services often view Deafness as a medical impairment. Many Deaf children do not see themselves as disabled, but members of a distinct cultural, linguistic group. This cultural lens affects their interactions with service providers who do not recognize Deaf culture. Communication difficulties often result.

Communication systems are often lacking when Deaf children seek help. Many agencies do not readily have an interpreter available. The agents may rely on family members to get survivors’ story, resulting in further embarrassment and reluctance of the survivor to report the crime.

Even if interpreters are present, a Deaf child must now report her or his story to two strangers instead of one. Access to Ubi Duo owned by sCOMM or trained staff who can operate this technology, is often unreliable, despite ADA law mandating this technology to patients (ADA Training Brief 2). Frustrating experiences with hearing “dispatchers” and law enforcement further dissuade Deaf children survivors from getting help.

A greater understanding of Deaf perception to service provision, and communication issues, is necessary to improve services to Deaf children survivors of Sexual assault in order to better address their cultural and individual needs. Along with the conclusion from analysis, the data suggests that interveners often lack the communication skills and systems to address the needs of Deaf children survivors of sexual assault.

American Sign Language interpreters are not always readily available to assist Deaf survivors, and interveners often resort to interpreters only when more traditional communication has failed.

Many agencies may not have a uniform policy for dealing with Deaf children survivors and their staff may lack a core cultural competence necessary for understand the unique barriers faced by these victims. Due to their unique barriers, Deaf children survivors under-report crimes perpetrated against them. As no reliable tracking exists of how and when Deaf children seek out services, statistics fail to accurately portray the level of survivorship faced by Deaf children, and the frequency in which they access help from law enforcement, hospitals, or social service agencies. Inadequate tracking results in inadequate preparedness in front line response. Lack of readiness creates an inadequate service response.

Response time increases when an interpreter is located. This could cause front line staff to use family members for interpretation, or attempt to glean details of the assault through less effective, incomplete methods of communication.

Staff is not efficiently trained in communication systems like Ubi Duo; If Ubi Duo is unavailable, the introduction of more efficient, advanced communication such as certified ASL interpreters are unlikely to be introduced. Also, personnel trained in conversational ASL are not qualified interpreters. Instead, Deaf children must rely on interpreters who are available but may not have the level of expressive and receptive sign competence needed in sensitive emergency situations.

There is much needed tremendous opportunity to shape and transform existing service for Deaf children survivors into services that offer comprehensive support, safety, and healing to survivors through medical, legal, and social advocacy.

For example, Deaf Counseling Center, Deaf Hope, et al provides as front line to become staunch hospital advocates, accompanying and supporting sexual assaults in need of forensic exams. Law enforcement and county prosecutors will become important advocates as Deaf children survivors navigate the criminal and legal systems to obtain protective orders and Deaf-specific legal supports. Mental health, sexual assault services can serve as community educators of topics directly related to psychological, medical, and social issues faced by Deaf children. Services specific to the needs of Deaf children survivors of sexual assault can promote healing.

Opposition to the development this task force concerns the development of an adequate training model. Where can best practices and culturally competent protocols be attained? Deaf Counseling Center is one of few organizations that offers technical training to service providers. The organization offers important pertinent training modules, including: sexual assault advocate certification, sexual assault in the Deaf community, Deaf culture, becoming accessible to Deaf children survivors.

Similar trainings can be found through ADWAS, a Seattle-based organization that has successfully duplicated its programs in cities across the country. Trainings useful to the Task Force include: education to understand issues of Deaf culture and language, professional development, providers working with Deaf children on issues of sexual assault, interpreter training on appropriate signs in criminal justice proceedings and medical settings.When I experienced sexual assault when I was ten years old, I never had of that stuff like today. Back in 1984, there was no training that would lay groundwork for a comprehensive integrated approach to service provision for Deaf children survivors nor culturally competent services did not result in increased access by members of the Deaf community and result in less taxpayer dollars in the long run. Ubi Duo owned by sCOMM is not healthy AT ALL. It hurts Deaf children even more.

I lived in the hearing community that destroyed my life than people can imagine. I was a forgotten survivor of sexual assault. The hearing world is very cruel.

Visit Deaf Counseling Center website for more information:

http://www.deafcounseling.com/

Visit Deaf Hope for more information:

http://www.deaf-hope.org/

Visit ADWAS for more information:

http://www.adwas.org/

-JT

Copyright © 2015 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.