Should Deaf Film Festival Run By Hearing Privileges?

Do you think it is fair for hearing privileges to be in charge of Deaf film festival?

 

 

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Gallaudet University SBG: Should We Allow CODA?

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I am writing this blog post to respond to a concern and had made me to ask myself the eternal question on the meaning of higher learning—not higher learning as we know at Gallaudet University, but our own learning by not to keep any question back; To attain a clear consciousness of sight that sees without writing so as to comprehend it as a healthy discourse. Our Deaf minds, must see to be truly free from oppression.

This is something we all need to be aware of this. Gallaudet University recently announced an executive branch for Student Body Government (SBG)— First of all, I would like to use this idea to understand why it is perfect opportunity for Sociology majors. I had been buttered by the concept of Sociology to carry my civil duty long before I arrive in Gallaudet community as alumnus as well. One of the courses, Foundations of Sociology where I first learned about W.E.B. DuBois, an important sociologist of all time, ends up one of my favorite sociologists to read and study.

W.E.B. DuBois once quoted, “It is a peculiar sensation, this double-consciousness, this sense of always looking at one’s self through the eyes of others…. One ever feels this twoness, as American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body”

From the executive branch: Chief of Staff, Andre Simons, a hearing folk. SBG has been ‘Deaf-centered’ for Deaf students who come to Gallaudet for life growth through the lens of Deafhood. There are many Deaf students who are mainstreamed who might struggle through to make a difference in politics and it is the perfect opportunity for them to grow and learn. Mr. Simons might a child of Deaf parents, [CODA], some people said it is OK for him to be part of SBG because he has a “Deaf-heart”. Some people are not comfortable with the idea. CODA or not, Mr. Simons need to respect Deaf people first.

Hearing and CODA in same sentence, what would you call it? Is Mr. Simons using this twoness, as hearing and a CODA? Two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings in a hearing body and join SBG that is designed for Deaf people. SBG is also two-souls and thoughts, American Sign Language (ASL) and Deaf and encouraging them to work for the intrinsic satisfaction of higher learning, a double-edged sword. In other words, within the SBG, higher learning is a central importance for DEAF students only.

People who are not comfortable with the idea of having hearing student in SBG’s executive branch merges to indicate that the Administration must change. There are two key items in the Gallaudet University Manual of Operations. 1) The student unit fee was distributed to various organizations and programs: SBG, Buff and Blue, Theatre, and others. 2) Dean of Student Affairs—Dwight Benedict is the students’ voice within the Administration.

Within the hearing student in SBG for the first time in history (to my knowledge), is it a fearful example of the damage wrecked by inbreeding leadership within the university administration? Outwardly, Gallaudet University gave no sign of the oppressive nature which would now appall the whole Deaf journey.

When I see the word, “CODA”–it has hearing privileges. Yes, they do. Even with “Deaf-heart”, will they ever really understand the fact Deaf people struggle with their own values or liberty and cannot easily reconcile with the real world? If a CODA sitting in the executive branch, it is showing a privilege to value his own individualism and self construct (academic performance) for himself and can only  find  self-destruct in attempting to grasp the elusive opportunities to escape oppressive judgement of Deaf peers who would curb his freedom.

SBG is often described as the heart of the Gallaudet University community-a central to the life of the university for Deaf people.

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-JT

Copyright © 2016 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only including this copyright message.

My Personal Struggles in Mainstreaming America

ImageNancy Rourke’s System Fails

After reading an article about Fausto Delgado, a Deaf mainstreamed kid who decided to take his life two weeks ago in California, and it hit me hard by bringing my memories back.

News flash: I never shared this with anyone but only two good friends know about it. When I was 14, I was so fed up with my life, I was a very unhappy individual, unable to express my own frustrations through sign language, and no one could really understood what I was going through. I grew up mainstreamed all my life and I could easily vouch that it was one of the most brutal experiences in my life.

One weekend in late April a long time ago, for example, I went inside the barn on my family’s property, I saw an opportunity by putting the rope on the beam around my neck, so I could commit suicide until my grandfather was walking up to the barn, I hid the rope right away and acted like nothing had happened. I could even remember my grandfather’s face, looking bit puzzled, and he asked me what I was doing there. Only that he did not know sign language. Home-signed “nothing” by shaking my head.

No one knew about this until now. That was in 1988, few weeks after Deaf President Now (DPN).

Why is it being labeled as the most misgiving in human life that being Deaf in mainstreaming is not normal? I had been subjected to limit ASL from being natural Deaf. My “sound-oriented” teachers, school administration, principals even most of my interpreters were deficit thinkers. I had one interpreter who was a Child of Deaf Adult (CODA) and she tried to help me so much she could then one day she moved away. I never knew what CODA meant until I was in my late 20’s. I can still remember my middle school principal, Mr. Hicks who was a mean-spirited bully, and he had one of the worst and poor flexibilities within Deaf Education that made my education to suffer. He allowed students to bully me as much as they could.

Mr. Hicks made sure that I was suffering from my own emotional insecurity and destroy my intellectual development within receiving fair education. From going through K-12, I was the target of bullies at the same time; I was suspended from school 18 times just for protecting myself. There were many stories to share.

Once, when I was in the third grade, I disobeyed an order from my interpreter “X” telling me to slow down because she did not like the fact that I was good in solving fractions so quickly in front of the other students making her look bad. But I was natural in mathematics then she actually slapped my face in the hallway and dragged my hand to go see my principal, Mrs. Gloria Pappas and I cried so hard asking, “WHY?! WHY?! WHY?!” and I ended up in detention for two days. My father never knew about this. When I was 17, I had a chance to visit Deaf school; I admit that I was shocked. I really wanted to go there, but I did not.

The mainstreaming system failed to release itself from the grasp of the bullying methods by permitting them to have as much influence in “power-struggling” Deaf students down in their faces. Once the bullying is granted to a fair and constant price more people will choose between bullying and intimidation. More Deaf students will have to suffer with their afflictions for lack of being to protect themselves, and lastly, more bullies will be able to find a way to belittle Deaf students that they are deemed to impossible to fight back. Mainstreaming schools for Deaf students will realize that the words of those bullies do apply to school administration and their families.

The Deaf body can be resilient but also frail and fallible and they are people, too. The mainstreaming is a dark pot into which activities that relates to many Deaf mainstreamed kids being bullied everyday. It is time to minimize aggression, bullying, threats, and distress. Why being hesitant by supporting bullying against Deaf kids that now are deeming to be ineffective?

It is evident that Deaf children in mainstreaming schools experience higher percentage of emotional abuses more than hearing peers. The safe haven in classrooms does not exist at all. The mainstreaming schools fails to make a cardinal decision by protecting Deaf students with public safety efforts and grant them freedom and protections. The problem is that the society is too ignorant. Will mainstreamed Deaf kids ever rehabilitate from emotional scars? Maybe. Maybe not.

One of my favorite authors, Barbara Perry wrote,

This historical example is a reminder that acts of discriminatory violence and intimidation—hate crimes—are not new phenomena in the United States. It is important to keep in mind that what we currently refer to as hate crime has a long historical lineage; the contemporary dynamics of hate-motivated violence have their origins in historical conditions. With respect to racial violence, at least, history does repeat itself, as similar patterns of motivation, sentiment, and victimization recur over time….”

It matches perfectly what mainstreamed Deaf kids experience discriminatory violence and intimidation—intellectual Audism. History does repeat itself…..

Remember that CODA interpreter I mentioned? Well, I bumped into her in Las Vegas in summer 2012 during World Deaf Expo, it was very nice to see her after 20 years and she said that I grew up so much and knowing I had very rough life and she said that she really wished she could have helped me out more to escape from dark rooms in mainstreaming schools. It was heartbreaking to see her say that. Maybe I could have better life. The society failed me. The mainstreaming system failed me. Even today they are still trying to make me a failure. The million-dollar question, what is the effect of dehumanizing Deaf students in mainstream classrooms?

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Third grade. Front row. Fourth person on the right with black watch (That is me) See first three boys in the very back on the left side. Bullies. In the second row, second person on the left, a boy who loved to taunt me. Years later we bumped into each other in high school at a wrestling tournament where we faced each other on the mat. Guess who won? By a majority score. Good times.

-JT

Copyright © 2013 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.