My Film In-Depth Analysis: “A Quiet Place”

 

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You see this picture above? The Deaf actress signs to her character father in the film scene, “It does not work!” in reference to cochlear implant.

A Quiet Place was one of the most controversial films of the year in Deaf community. My reflection about this film is a major challenge. The opening scene of cochlear implant first thing exposes the arrogance of modern medicine and the decided failure of our society in heeding health system. The culture of fear continues.

Is it to benefit medicine and battery corporate controlled systems? The root of this aforementioned control is that those profiting from practicing medicine and selling batteries see no money to be made in respecting Deaf culture first thing.

It was powerful enough to create an image to meet the advanced methods of blatant oppression that approaches and questions necessary. It is only the beginning. Is this a sign of cochlear implant war? Is this a sign of third wave of Oralism? It only gets worsened when it comes to “Deafness”. In this film about profiting from cochlear implants, I would like to point out that cochlear implant crisis threatens not only economic collapse among families but also educational inflation beleaguered by costly services.

Hollywood needs to be honest about arrogance of Deaf culture.

Does this film’s approach of cochlear implants to be personal and individual freedom challenge the norms of Deaf community? Does this film of powerful and oppressive forces simply create Audism? The critical examination shows the absence of cultural contribution to the Deaf community and the tradition of literacy canon in this film. This cultural oppression is directly related in Hollywood historical tradition of systematic and institutional Audism proscribing an inferior status to Deaf babies.

Not only did this cultural phenomenon produce a scant offering of works by cochlear implant companies, criticism of Deaf babies that are not implanted in regard to these offerings were indicting and angry, perhaps that Deaf babies should stray too far from their state of happiness in the “pursuit” of healthy journey. Truth be told, however, Hollywood remains a nonstarter for “bonding” purposes.

Carol Padden and Tom Humphries write in one of their book chapters:

We had heard several stories along themes similar to the ones in this folktale, but it was not until we were displaced in a foreign country that we were able to recognize consciously what until then we had only intuitively understood: these stories are myths, tales, parables that carry the set of ideas about what makes it possible to be a Deaf person. By retelling these stories the group can talk about a knowledge it believes to be essential, its lifeblood.” (Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture)

Hollywood was supposed to be the front-line lifeblood of knowledge. We need to look at the central role of the public and private split has played in big issues such as Audism, oppression, and human rights, the need for “cochlear implant” spaces, and the legacies of colonialism. Relationships and Hollywood abound in many ways, cochlear implant industries are able to experience the many forms of big money that emerge to practice the oppression of Deaf babies, through the eyes of Hollywood.

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The pairing of cochlear implant to beloved friend, Hollywood illustrates the perhaps most ill perceived of Deaf babies with pride and prejudice. Both parties desire the film to fulfill familial and societal expectations, establish battery economics, and affix social status connections that Hollywood supplant cochlear implant industries firmly with first-class genteel society.

I was clearly disappointed with the grand opening of the film that hurts the most. Looking back through history of 12 Deaf children who died from cochlear implant surgeries in 1989 and the many painful stories by cochlear implant survivors to this date today and the future, too. This abiding human question about whether cultural oppression strikes at the very soul of Deaf humanity—of how Hollywood view Deaf babies. The stories about how successful cochlear implants are myths and tales.

So much for “these stories are myths, tales, parables that carry the set of ideas about what makes it possible to be a Deaf person

-JT

Copyright © 2018 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

Your Best Activity: Reading

ImageReading a book is an invisible thread that could change one’s life. It begins with a warning that “a book belongs to a very few”, perhaps to no one yet living. Warnings aside, be begins by sketching the idea of declining vs. ascending life and culture. An animal, a species, or an individual becomes “depraved” or “decadent” when it loses its instincts for that which sustains its life, and “prefers what is harmful to it”.

Life itself presupposes an instinct for growth, for sustenance, for “the will to power”, the striving for some degree of control and mastery of one’s surroundings. Deafhood journey sets itself up in opposition to those instincts, and hence Deafhood is an expression of defending your human right, an evidence of the will to life.

By building a value–indeed, the highest value-its depressive effects thwart those instincts which preserve life, establishing Deaf people as the standard of value. The rejection of Deaf culture and ASL does not proscribe generosity, magnanimity, or benevolence–indeed the latter are mandated for “higher” types what is rejected to allow the ill-constituted to define what is good. Reading a book is a hundred times wiser and more realistic and is the highest and learned class to recognize the instincts of the subjugated and the oppressed groups, for example, Deaf people.

It was the audists who first falsified the inner and outer world with a metaphysically complete anti-world, one in which natural causality plays no role. One might of course object that such a concept of Deaf person considerably predates Aristotle who said Deaf people are dumb. The audists did this out of hatred with a good reason: to belittle and shut out Deaf people out of society. Thus, the audists view the Deaf people as shrewdly inculcating guilt, resentment, and other values hostile to life among their oppressors as a form of ideological germ warefare, taking care not to become fully infected themselves.

The books, Understanding Deaf Culture: In Search of Deafhood and many other Deaf books such as When the Mind Hears: A History of the Deaf by Harlan Lane made a move to retreat into a state of extreme withdrawal from ‘the world’ undisturbed by reality of any kind. Also, to recognize the fear of pain even in infinitely small amounts, and the books itself are standing in opposition to every active virtue and ask yourself how can books like Inside Deaf Culture by Carol Padden have the dignity and accomplishment not feel ashamed to be called a proud Deaf person.

Not only do the audists deprive us of the benefits of Deaf culture, it was a culture from which audists could and should have learned much, it is their loss. So, reading books is the way of revolutionizing everything that crawls upon the ground directly against that which is elevated: the gospel of the lowly makes low. Deaf people are not the gospel of the lowly. Do we are able to forgive or forget what our enemies were the “intelligent ones” persons far more civilized, erudite, and accomplished than themselves, people who they felt more fit to rule and control Deaf people today.

That is why reading books is important to begin count time from the start of growing pain, the writing of Understanding Deaf Culture: In Search of Deafhood then I would now be writing those words in the highest honor that I get the wish to meet Paddy Ladd himself. It is all about self-sacrifice that allows people to continue to believe in their principles. Reading a book can be your best activity.

-JT

Copyright © 2013 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.