Cued Speech Returns to National Spotlight: For All the Wrong Reasons

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Dr. Richard Cornett, who coined Cued Speech in 1966, quotes: “I had supposed that deaf persons were bookworms, served by reading as their one clear window on the world. A few months of study convinced me that the underlying cause of their reading problem was the lack of any reasonable way to learn spoken language, without which they could not use speech for communication, become good lip readers, or learn to read (as opposed to being taught the recognition of each written world). So, I really started with the conclusion that what was needed was a convenient way to represent the spoken language accurately, through vision, in real time. That was the problem I set out to solve, the perceived need that set my direction.”

Today, in 2019, hearing people who had been doing the tricks of “hearing-washing” Deaf people to recognize and claim that Cued Speech is the gateway to the clear window on the world of excelling in written English and a better reader. Cued Speech is just a tool. Besides, Cued Speech is a hearing privilege.

Way before the first selfie, American Sign Language (ASL) had shown the myth of Cued Speech about how it would improve superior written English skills; it has already shown a myth already. Besides, ASL was discovered and wandered in the search of language truth first before Cued Speech and it is too late.

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Cued Speech had rejected ASL, showing its own reflection of language oppression what it is known as language hegemony in Deaf world, just like the power of English attempting to control the world as highly recommend to read a book called “Globish: How English Became the World’s Language” by Robert McCrum, co-author of “The Story of English”—Pstt. It is really good book to read. Really!

Let’s turn our thoughts to the language hegemony. It strikes me the most that the Cued Speech is ideological more than phenomenal. Its “OR” choice: to weaken or destroy ASL and Deaf Culture based on its proposed creation of a “new order of Deaf people” into Oralism.

Improving written English is better when Cued Speech is in the picture, and the problem is that it has been brainwashed. However, Cued Speech is just bullshit, and it is no wonder that Cued Speech is so fossilized it has gone too long and proved enough that Cued Speech was never a success. ASL, one of top five most popular languages in America, nothing can beat that!

The leadership of Cued Speech is still flawed, yet, dumbing Deaf people down. Familiarity breeds contempt. Come on, it applauds me the most that Deaf people would claim that Cued Speech would improve English skills when they never experienced Cued Speech themselves and yet, give the power to Cued Speech Association.

Let’s look at this way. ASL, Deaf Culture, Deaf Life—is the reason they are breathing the most because of the strongest bond ever. There are “plenty” of ASL curriculum showing it’s the strongest accreditation”—derived from an old Latinate word for “trustworthy” and in today’s terms, it means ASL should be trusted as high quality.

I mean, come on, ASL was discovered in 1965, beating Cued Speech by a year, and it has shown far more sophisticated and serious institution than most of us could ever imagine, but seeing its validity and appreciating its importance for Deaf culture upon having a clear definition of what ASL is all about.

In closing, what I am trying to convey the message above is that Cued Speech is not enchantment and its primary intent is not to take idle excursions into imaginary lands inhabited by characters from classics. It is disenchantment enough to take a hard look at essential realities through the language and culture Deaf people knows the best. Hearing privileges does not belong in this society.

The whole point is that ASL had already shown or proved that emotional, intellectual, and linguistically realities are what so much of the truth in Deaf life seems designed to challenge us, Deaf people from.

Sure, what I had learned so much how much ASL is important to Deaf life, it’s damn beautiful, cannot describe so powerfully, that ASL is a radical, in that it addresses the roots of our own experience, and that is powerful, in that its intention is to overturn and banish illusion—illiteracy in ASL and Deaf Culture. Personal, social, and cultural rationalizations concerning ourselves as Deaf people—we need to stand up against Cued Speech.

ASL will never steal away from intellectual freedom out of oppressive language such as Cued Speech, and we need to continue standing up against Cued Speech and its Oralism practices.

LEAD-K is what had been struck in hearing world, and had been a sad state of our own Deaf society is in to cause a Deaf person to want to be defined in someone else’s language. Isn’t that what ASL is all about? Being translated, being lost in the translation? On the other hand, it is going to be a great way to explain the reason in the fresh air of truth. It really makes many Deaf people want to learn how to discuss ASL.

-JT

Copyright © 2019 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

 

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Why Open Captioning is a Fundamental Right

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Attention: Councilmember Charles Allen

Council of the District of Columbia

1350 Pennsylvania Avenue NW

Suite 110

Washington, DC 20004

December 30, 2018

Bill B22-0957: Open Movie Captioning Requirement Act of 2018:

Sir, and the Council members for the Council of the District of Columbia:

As a member of DC Deaf community, the understanding of social, political, and sociological fields, what is justice, and the human rights, and the public eye is becoming a common means for what a life in District of Columbia to make sure Deaf citizens receive fair accessibility for communication, information, and knowledge.

Open captioning is a fundamental right even in the constitutional document itself; The First Amendment: the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances;

The Ninth Amendment: The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

The rights for open captioning cannot be violation of Deaf people. Neglecting Deaf people’s public spaces for years and years have been enabled and promoted are counterproductive, Un-American, anti-factual, and diversionary. The First Amendment—freedom of speech, peaceably to assemble, and petition the Government for a redress of grievances, protects Deaf people. Why?

“Government of the District of Columbia. The Government of the District of Columbia operates under Article One of the United States Constitution and the District of Columbia Home Rule Act, which devolves certain powers of the United States Congress to the Major and thirteen-member Council.”

However, Deaf community shows the true hope and human society within cultural changes in District of Columbia, and the greatest mission of open captioning for Deaf community requires our resistance to the frustration of being denied for a full theatrical experience at any cost.

Open captioning would rekindle ourselves as the Deaf community to claim literacy rights in higher learning. Open captioning becomes highly sophisticated in our language and culture in the same manner as our hearing counterparts in their own language, English.

Happy New Year!

-JT

Copyright © 2019 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

References:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Government_of_the_District_of_Columbia

How to be a Better Champion

A high school wrestling referee in New Jersey made a wrestler choose between cutting his dreadlocks or forfeiting his match on Wednesday. Written English transcript is available.

 

Rethinking ASL Justice & AGBell Colonialism

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Without question, 2018 has been emotional, heart-breaking, heart-crunching, heart-wrenching, hurt, being lied to, being deceived, confused, showing the culture of bystander, denials, and lost souls for Deaf community. Where is justice for American Sign Language (ASL)?

LEAD-K. It was never about data. It was about Alexander Graham Bell. With our help, we need to stand up for justice and stop Alexander Graham Bell patronizing Deaf people down. In fact, the word of the year for 2018 by Merriam-Webster has chosen “justice”—how fitting it is.

In New York Times by Dan Levin, writes that:‘in choosing the noun, Merriam-Webster said that it was looked up on its website 74 percent more often than in 2017’

 LEAD-K was never about justice. It was more like travesty. What is travesty? Representing in a false or distorted way and that is how Deaf community felt about being represented in a false picture that it is all right to team up with Alexander Graham Bell.

LEAD-K helped Alexander Graham Bell gain more prejudice against ASL in our Deaf community. They are allowing Alexander Graham Bell to gain access to hate and Surdophobia in Deaf schools and mainstreaming schools.

Two years after LEAD-K formed, there are two things are absolutely clear: Alexander Graham Bell’s words and actions reflect the Audism, Surdophobia, and Hate Speech that had been at the face of the LEAD-K campaign. Now Cued Speech is forming in Virginia and Illinois—and wants to spread all over America with the help of LEAD-K. It was never about data or improving literacy in reading and writing.

A coalition of activists had been spending a lot of time, energy, and passion to bring the truth about Alexander Graham Bell’s hateful ideology. There are plenty of Deaf artists who drew pictures of how Alexander Graham Bell are dangerous proves effective, with survivors of Alexander Graham Bell gaining greater understanding through their own artwork.

There are plenty of Deaf writers who took it to the streets, social media, and public, showing the truth about Alexander Graham Bell and sends a message onto the platform to distribute truth and challenging the lies that makes Deaf students “successful” with Cued Speech, listening and speaking, and cochlear implants, and the list goes on, making Alexander Graham Bell for the message.

LEAD-K claims that it would support the foundation of Deaf children, and help protect young lives from the destructive effects of Oralism, but Deaf community got fooled badly.

The educational materials would help and empower Deaf people with the facts they need to live healthy, Audism-free lives. We need to continue and stand up against Audism and Surdophobia practice and conquer the language hegemony or oppression.

Now it is time for us to spread the truth. We stand up for social justice! We stand up for ASL justice!

-JT

Copyright © 2018 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

Five Years Later: Carl Schroeder’s Ongoing Influence

Five years ago today, Carl Schroeder passed away. We need to remember the birthright what Carl did for Gallaudet University 30 years ago and today. He inspired the spectators on the night before the students and other people marched to the Mayflower Hotel. Even Fred Weiner shared this story for DPN25: The 7 Ducks Behind the DPN Movement produced and narrated by Benjamin Jarashow. Please see the picture of video below:

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Fred Weiner signs: “I knew there would be just disruption. We were in, ah, the auditorium,………I mean, Carl was talking to students. The very first time when we saw them, we thought, oh, my gosh there is no control here. The three of us went into the corner and started talking about this.

That’s actually the picture that you see published in “When The Week the World Heard Gallaudet. I mean it just exploded. It blew up. From that point on, I warned people, this is going to get crazy. If you pick Zinser it is over and there were people who questioned that. But I knew from that moment.” [You can find the video online]

The picture right here below.

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If it were not for Mayflower Hotel, it would not be Carl Schroeder. The people, who were part of the march, became the face of Deaf identity. It was a flip switch for a light bulb. As in the days of hearing oppression against Deaf people until 1988, seemed to change the history out into the open.

Carl Schroeder stirred Deaf America’s melting pot of language war and oppressors emerged. It was not just the pride of Deaf identity, Deaf people had been found themselves as targets of identity oppression for the hearing status—both on the campus and in real life.

He delivered the message as it was time to make Gallaudet—to break the glass ceiling and gave Deaf people to overcome outrage in the hearing world, which helped them to overcome the oppression movement.

It was one of the most important display of Deaf President Now (DPN) in America, who had long felt safe in the Gallaudet community even as they dealt with the struggles since Milan Resolution 1880 for the practice of rhetoric and Audism acts in Deaf community.

Carl Schroeder, your contribution to DPN and its congregation, was very important 30 years ago and today, as with Deaf America, the importance of storytelling will never disappear and respectfully, heal.

-JT

Copyright © 2018 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

Celebrating the Bill of Rights

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227 years ago today, the Bill of Rights was shown to the public eye. The people of the eye are also protected by the Bill of Rights. As I wrote this column for DEAF LIFE: Our Constitutional Crisis in April 2018 Issue. Permission was granted to share this column.

“When Deaf people are facing a time of crisis, it is extremely important that they understand their Constitutional rights.

For the past five years, I’ve been asking Deaf people basic questions about the Bill of Rights (the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution)—and considering what’s been happening, a basic knowledge of the answers to these questions could be life-saving. But during these five years, I found only one Deaf person who knew all ten amendments.

Only one? What happened to what we learned about democracy in school? Were we ever taught that the Constitution was written and ratified to resist the tyranny of the ruling minority? Were we taught about the Bill of Rights, discussing each amendment, so we could understand the principle of equal protection?

We can ask—but won’t get any answer—why Deaf students didn’t learn about this before graduating, or why Deaf schools or mainstreamed programs failed to teach them. How can we hold schools accountable for these results?

The U.S. Constitution is a “living document” that can be interpreted, as legal protection should Deaf people face excessively harsh treatment by law enforcement. Recently, one Saturday night, I attended a Deaf social gathering in Washington, where a Deaf woman was sharing her experience with me about an encounter with local police, and how an officer, who knew a little bit of ASL, told her, “I am cold, I need to come in,” and forced himself into her house without her permission. She told me that she felt violated.

Then I asked her if she knew anything about the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution. She said, “No.” I explained to her what the Fourth Amendment says: Prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures and requires any search warrant to be judicially sanctioned and supported by probable cause.

I told her that her Constitutional rights had indeed been violated. Certainly, it’s not the first time that a police officer entered a citizen’s house without a search warrant. It is perfectly legal to tell the police that they cannot come in without a proper search warrant. You have the right to say no, and they don’t have the right to barge in. It is your home. It is your property. (Even if you’re renting an apartment or saying at a friend’s house, you have your property with you.)

The key is better education about our Constitutional rights. If it’s impractical to enroll in continuing education classes, you can get access to the Constitution and Bill of Rights, and study them carefully. And reread them every so often so you don’t forget. The text of the Constitution and Bill of Rights are posted online, can be borrowed, in book form with commentaries, from the public library, or can be purchased. It’s a good investment. Booklets containing the text and amendments can sometimes be obtained free of charge from nonprofit organizations.

Parents of Deaf children, Deaf members of locally elected Deaf school boards, teachers of the Deaf, Deaf advocates, and grassroots Deaf community members should recognize that we’re responsible for ourselves and our fellow Deaf citizens. Empowerment begins with education. We need to teach each other and educate the uneducated about why understanding our Constitutional rights is crucially important, and a survival skill we all need to know.

If we believe that our rights have been violated, do we understand what those rights are? Do we understand what the laws are?

Shouldn’t we?”

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-Jason “JT” Tozier is a former Gallaudet University graduate student living in Washington, D.C; He was a scholarship recipient for ASL/Deaf Studies with emphasis in Cultural Studies at Gallaudet.

He is Chair of Deaf Political Action Committee—District of Columbia Chapter, Chair of National Deaf Consumers United, Director for We the Deaf People, Inc.’s District of Columbia Chapter, member of National Deaf Task Force on Police and Emergency Services, and Founder of Deaf Access Justice.

In his spare time, he loves to play cribbage and chess, reading books, lecturing, and blogging.