Deafhood Foundation: A Criminal Record Shouldn’t Define Your Entire Existence

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Deafhood Foundation writes, Your donation will help end the economic exploitation of Deaf people, support anti-audism work, and create a society where everyone experiences full humanity and celebrates American Sign Language and Deaf culture.”

I have had been thinking about this for a while. For the last eight years, I have had invested a lot of heart and believability in Deafhood Foundation after reading Understanding Deaf Culture: In Search of Deafhood written by Paddy Ladd. The book arrived at my apartment in Portland, Oregon in April 2010 and I finished that book on the same day. It was mind-blowing experience. As soon as I finished that book, I remember calling up a friend who was one of certified Deafhood presenters and had brief discussion about it. I understood the magnitude of healing. That was the goal.

Two weeks after finishing that book, I was walking on Hawthorne Street in Portland, one of the famous streets, most laid-back streets, and there was a tattoo shop, and I decided to walk in and asked them to give me a tattoo, ‘Deafhood’ on my left arm where it ends up being first Deaf person to have ‘Deafhood’ in America. I was very proud of it.

Fast forward. June 2011. I was awarded with three degrees with honors. I worked very hard as Deaf returnee. I remember that day when I was released from jail in 1996, I told myself; I will never look back and make a huge difference in future. Day after day, year after year, I had no guidance, no space to call my own, or where to go. It was very difficult to deal with. I was separated from friends and Deaf community. I refused to be the scapegoat.

Couple of years later, a Deaf person informed me that the board position was open on the same day, and I immediately became interested in board position. I contacted one of the founding board members for Deafhood Foundation, and the board member said to me that I would not be welcomed on the board and I was devastated more than anything in my life all because I am a Deaf returnee. WITHOUT due process or screened—nothing just like that. Just right on spot right there. I was completely surprised and hurt, too.

It was a major discriminatory. I was surprised that the founding board member signed to me that I’d be “frustrated” and knew that it was discriminating against its own Deaf member in Deaf community. It was a huge blow. It shows that Deafhood Foundation does not support recidivism in Deaf community.

When I had to re-read the book by Paddy Ladd, I realized that the book does not support Deaf returnees either. If less than 0.00000005 percent of Deaf returnees suffering today—the truth supported by lack of awareness, the support matters, and goes a long way, How can we improve this conscious?

Think about emotional and physical impact that has gone deep enough to deal with struggles, with the capacity to think strong that has stored enough. Thought-provoking adventures. I live by reading books doing everything I can to make a living on the streets, and effectively deal with a world that most of us would never understand would never understand what it is like or known about. I often wonder about discovering the origin of life.

It will make a big impact of the overall quality of life. Can we articulate the specific needs of empowerment by building bridges to Deaf community? Maya Angelou once said, “When people show you who they are, believe them”—that’s where it starts right there.

So, why not Deafhood Foundation supports Deaf returnees? The “philosophy” of Deafhood Foundation in the broadest sense, ignoring a barrier repertoire—stories, literacy expressions and the like—against Deaf returnees whose forms of expressions exert upon them.

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Where are the tears of joy—and tears of pride? Having being “incarcerated” since my early teen years, I had ever experienced a pursuit of happiness before and never thought I would have that opportunity, my young adulthood forever lost. Deaf returnees do not given a second chance as “productive contributor” to Deaf community.

Deafhood Foundation, where is the compassion and willingness about Deaf returnees to put their lives on the line for others is deeply rooted in their own struggles for being given the opportunity for redemption and for being welcomed back into society?

In Paddy’s Corner: Dr. Ladd coined the word “Deafhood” to describe positive ways of being Deaf in spite of the discrimination and oppression, and to present a framework to understand our past, work within the present, and plan for the future.”

What about the positive framework to understand Deaf returnees’ past, work with the present, and plan for the future to focus on positive ways of being Deaf in spite of the discrimination and oppression every day?

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Few months ago, when I attended as lone Deaf attendee for ACLU National Conference in Washington, D.C.—I saw a powerful image that says I believe a criminal record shouldn’t define your entire existence”—sadly, Deafhood Foundation does not see that way that it would always define your entire existence forever because Deaf community is small–and quickly judged by its looks and books.

-JT

Copyright © 2018 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

 

 

 

Deafhood: A Journey of Greater Thinking

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Paddy Ladd. Jason “JT” Tozier. September 2012. University of Washington.

Humans live in landscapes of make believe.- Jonathan Gottscall

No doubt, with proper preparation on your part, any research you do will be an effective tool towards helping you with the art of Deafhood journey. With the wealth of information that you will gather over time, you will never run out of stories to tell.

What is Deafhood journey? Subject is what stories and a journey is how the meaning of Deafhood journey is defined. Each Deaf person’s journey does not explicitly inform the audience what the journeys are. Instead, the audience must infer this from what they have learned from the journey. Deafhood journey is how the process relates to real human experience.

No matter how cleverly plotted your Deafhood journey is, the audience must relate to a widely understood story theme. In Deafhood journey, stories feed each other and overlap. Just like Pablo Picasso’s quote, “If there were only one truth, you couldn’t paint a hundred canvasses in the same theme.”

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The Deaf community wake up confused. They find themselves en route to find their Deafhood journey and accompanied by someone who experienced Deafhood journey themselves. They look around and find there are about thousands of them huddling together in an open wagon by a fine-looking horse.

They find the journey that awaits them or as their escort points out “agora” or “gathering place” The important thing is to realize that the English verb “to gather” is from Greek verb “ageiro” so the noun agora must come from the same Greek term. They get confused because they are not sure if they are dreaming. Maybe not!

Oh, the horse-drawn wagon stops, and they better get off now. There are many Deaf people who are trying to find their own Deafhood journey milling around, nor minding their presence. And they are learning to distinguish between public gestures and it must be complex. Deaf people see in the center of the journey, a process. How does that translate into positive thinking?

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To master positive thinking, active learning is a core element of their learning. Deaf people would benefit a lot from their Deafhood journey to identify their freedom, bound, and inflectional, derivative or obsolete environment and they shall design the goal and assessment for understanding of their journey just as much as building a high view of confidence.

They would master the basic content and also express in creative and challenging ways. They feel the true growing of pain. They are taught content but process, the methodology by Deafhood journey is generated.

-JT

Copyright © 2018 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.

Unlocking The Deaf Mind

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It was on September 7th, 1880 when Abbe Giulio Tarra, the conference president held an emergency press conference for Second International Congress on Education of the Deaf to make a proposal known today as the Milan Resolution in Italy. It was the date that would live in infamy—government agencies around the world began to attack Deaf people forcibly and deliberately in an attempt to discredit sign languages by taking away the language status as Deaf people’s human right. Oralism has since locked the mystery of the Deaf mind. Is it a grand lesson of history?

Louis Michael Siedman, a professor at Georgetown University Law Center teaching constitutional law, published the book, On Constitutional Disobedience, and in this book, he questions, “Why should we care about what the Constitution says? Should we feel obligated to obey it? How can we make decisions today based on a document created more than 200 years ago?”

The term, Audism, was coined by Tom Humphries in 1975, and it was built behind the brick walls for a while until Paddy Ladd published his book, Understanding Deaf Culture: In Search of Deafhood in 2003, it has became evidently strong. In fact, Deafhood is the only cardinal way to unlock the mystery of the Deaf mind.

When Deafhood appeared into our Audism dictionary of, the U.S. Constitution must establish a judicial system as a challenge to our Constitutionality. The question: does the U.S. Constitution threaten to undermine Deaf people’s foundational documents to have their own human right to be Deaf? Can we the Deaf change the laws including our constitutional laws to keep American Sign Language (ASL) strong? Yes, we can!

Yes, I know it is just some old news…but now there is the second wave of Oralism and we must generate stories about our language and culture–ASL, which has positive results with our own mind, it is also meant to provide ourselves by planting the seeds necessary to ensure a happy, healthy, and long-lasting relationship with ASL. When Deaf people use ASL, they are fully-fledged citizens. They coast on waves of silence and can relay the most gripping messages using only their hands. Their existence encompasses many planes, the highest ones being the leader, and the least populated. Home of the humble elite, stripped of their pride by the glamour stealing nature of life and their lessons and also the fates and their scissors. ASL reaches out to the individuals to guide them to these higher places. One of their most utilized methods to do so is literature.

People often turn to books and pamphlets to lead them into the metaphysical world by making manifest the questions they ask everyday, like ‘who am I?’ or ‘what is my purpose?” We the Deaf need to create more literature so it can be possess so much enlightenment the planar hierarchy that exists Deaf people is very much highly apparent and carry on live amidst a populace of lesser beings. Deaf people are the metaphysical social caste system to order the importance of their stories with the most enlightened and complimentary stories being the least. After all, ASL in literature is very much part of the Deaf world where it has forms of Deafhood to share their Deaf experiences because they exist.

Back to Siedman’s question above, “Why should we care about what the Constitution says? Should we feel obligated to obey it? How can we make decisions today based on a document created more than 200 years ago?” –-Yes, we need to trace our roots to a firm presence in Deafhood life to establish a use of our paternal tone, and supports our needs to use constrained language, ASL. We need to use our legitimacy by being part of something greater than the Second wave of Oralism: We all have ancestral ties to Deafhood, its traditions and its history. Our personal identities play an important part in national and international identity, then and now. The name of Deafhood as it is explicated here, is stronger and older than the U.S. Constitution today.

-JT

Copyright © 2013 Jason Tozier

This text may be freely copied in its entirely only, including this copyright message.